care

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CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
The relocation of ENT outpatient clinics to the Ambulatory Care Center follows the transfer of the ENT surgery service from Hamad General Hospital late last year.
The ambulatory care setting also requires nurses to apply systems thinking to address the complex care coordination needs of patients.
The Hamd Medical Corporation (HMC)'s Ambulatory Care Centre (ACC) recently welcomed the first outpatients at its digestive (GI) and liver disease clinics, which have moved from their previous location at Hamad General Hospital.
63156 code of public health, regional health agencies define in the context of specifications Regional loads permanence ambulatory care on the one hand the terms of general organization ensuring the provision of care management applications unscheduled care, and determine the other hand, the amounts of packages and call control, within the limits defined by the decree of 20 April 2011.
section]) Ambulatory care (physician's office, medical clinic, and other ambulatory care setting).
Nancy is currently in the middle of a course of intravenous antibiotics to clear up her infection and has been attending the ambulatory care unit in Wansbeck every three days to get her cannula changed by the specialist nurses.
If your GP or A&E staff refer you to ambulatory care, it usually means that you won't have to stay in hospital overnight or be admitted for treatment as you will be treated quickly and discharged home as soon as possible.
An ambulatory float pool model may be a strategy organizational leaders consider as they examine their ambulatory care nursing practice because float pools have been effective in reducing staff costs in inpatient settings (Dziuba-Ellis, 2006; Linzer et al.
There is no doubt that ambulatory care training is key.
The company's PDS group was tapped to oversee the ground-up construction of a 92,000 s/f, three-story Ambulatory Care Pavilion and a new 223,000 s/f, 630-space parking garage.
GS&P was asked to create a site master plan that would provide up to 150,000 square feet for future delivery of ambulatory care services and physician office space.
Seventy percent of these nurses were in private hospitals, while 19 percent worked in ambulatory care and 8 percent in nursing homes.

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