ameloblast

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ameloblast

[′am·ə·lō‚blast]
(embryology)
One of the columnar cells of the enamel organ that form dental enamel in developing teeth.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ameloblastic carcinomas appear to carry a better prognosis than other tumor types for reasons that are still unclear, (2) although maxillary tumors behave worse than mandibular neoplasms, (20) with up to one-third of maxillary tumors yielding lung metastases.
Caption: Figure 5: Photomicrograph showing ameloblastic epithelium.
Ameloblastic fibroma is a rare, mixed odontogenic tumor composed of dental papilla-like odontogenic ectomesenchyme and odontogenic epithelium.
We present a case of ameloblastic fibroodontoma (AFO) in a 6-year-old male patient with distinctive orofacial manifestations, radiographic findings, histopathological report, and differential diagnosis with treatment to add to the existing knowledge.
Ameloblastic odontomas can be classified into ameloblastic fibro-odontoma and odonto-ameloblastoma.
Thus they established calretinin as a specific immunohistochemical marker for neoplastic ameloblastic tissue that can be used as an important diagnostic aid in the differential diagnosis of unicystic ameloblastoma and cystic odontogenic lesions20.
Ameloblastic carcinoma is a rare type of ameloblastoma that has received little mention in the literature.
The expression of Notch1, Notch2, Notch3 (32), Dlll (33), Jag1 (34) and Jag2 (35,36) prefigure ameloblastic and non-ameloblastic region subdivision in the initial stages of tooth development (table 2).
Elzay [3] and Slootweg and Muller [4] used the term ameloblastic carcinoma to convey the presence of cytologic features of malignancy.
Unicystic ameloblastoma is a tumor with a strong propensity for recurrence especially when the ameloblastic focus penetrates the adjacent tissue from the wall of the cyst.
With regard to the postnatal period, health problems could disturb the ameloblastic activity during enamel mineralisation because of direct pathological influence or hypoxia, respiratory disease, hypocalcaemia, fever, and malnutrition [Chowdhury and Bromage, 2000; Jalevik et al., 2001; Lygidakis et al., 2008].
It has been suggested that this type of EH results from an interference in the usual ameloblastic activity during the appositional phase of enamel development; this hindrance in turn results in an area of disturbed matrix formation (5).