Fibroma

(redirected from ameloblastic fibroma)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to ameloblastic fibroma: Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor

fibroma

[fī′brō·mə]
(medicine)
A benign tumor composed primarily of fibrous connective tissue. Also known as fibroid tumor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fibroma

 

a mature benign tumor of connective tissue, which can occur in any part of the body. Fibromas may be diffuse or encapsulated, depending on the nature of their growth. Fibroblasts are the source of fibromas, hence their other name, fibroblastomas. The symptoms and the course of a fibroma depend on the site and the rate of growth. Malignant degeneration sometimes occurs. Fibromas are treated surgically.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ameloblastic fibroma is usually present as a painless, and slowly growing mass.
Ameloblastic fibromas can rarely transform to ameloblastic fibrosarcoma when untreated or more commonly, following multiple local recurrences of a benign ameloblastic fibroma, with the subsequent recurrence consisting of a sarcoma.
Although the etiology is not clear, it is generally thought to originate from a precursor lesion, especially ameloblastic fibroma (3, 60).
Excisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis as ameloblastic fibroma.The patient has been followed up periodically till 3 years.
Ameloblastic fibroma is a true histologicbiphasic tumor because epithelial and mesenchymal components are part of the neoplastic process.
Malignant transformation of ameloblastic fibroma to ameloblastic fibrosarcoma: case report and review of the literature.
Ameloblastic fibromas and related tumors in cattle.
Lesions of this size can occur in odontogenic keratocysts, in ameloblastic fibromas, and in Pingborg's tumors, which originate from odontogenic sources.