amethyst

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amethyst

(ăm`əthĭst) [Gr.,=non-drunkenness], variety of quartzquartz,
one of the commonest of all rock-forming minerals and one of the most important constituents of the earth's crust. Chemically, it is silicon dioxide, SiO2.
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, violet to purple in color, used as a gem. It is the most highly valued of the semiprecious quartzes. It is associated with a number of superstitions, being regarded as a love charm, as a potent influence in improving sleep, and as a protection against thieves and drunkenness. Brazil, Uruguay, Siberia, Sri Lanka, and parts of North America are important sources of supply. The so-called Oriental amethyst, or purple sapphire, is not quartz but a variety of corundum, a much harder and rarer stone.

Amethyst

 

a mineral, a violet or sky blue-violet variety of quartz (SiO2). On heating to 300–350°C, amethyst becomes yellow or is discharged. Decolorized amethyst reacquires its color after exposure to X rays. The mineral occurs in quartz veins, granitic rocks, amygdules of volcanic rocks, and sometimes in sedimentary rocks, such as silicon salts. The best specimens are used for jewelry and as ornamental stones. Especially fine are amethysts from the Urals and Brazil. A blue-violet variety of corundum is known in the jeweler’s craft as eastern amethyst.

amethyst

[′am·ə‚thist]
(mineralogy)
The transparent purple to violet variety of the mineral quartz; used as a jeweler's stone.

amethyst

February. [Am. Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 319–320]

amethyst

preserved soldiers from harm; gave them victory. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 58]

amethyst

provides protection against drunkenness; February birthstone. [Gem Symbolism: Kunz, 58–59]

amethyst

1. a purple or violet transparent variety of quartz used as a gemstone. Formula: SiO2
2. a purple variety of sapphire; oriental amethyst
3. the purple colour of amethyst
References in periodicals archive ?
Spruce Ridge quartz is commonly sceptered, and in some cases is amethystine or Japan-law twinned.
The quartz scepters from Denny Mountain are among the world's finest, and the beautiful "Raspberry quartz" scepters (colored by sparkling red inclusions), some of them amethystine as well, are unique.
Traffic had been likewise brisk in the new specimens of amethystine Japan-law twinned quartz out of the Tonglushan mine, Daye district, Hubei, which Collector's Edge had procured.
The amethystine color ranges from faint violet to a deep purple, and the contrast of gemmy amethyst caps on opaque, porcelain-white stems is particularly aesthetic.
Multiple generations of quartz (fine-grained, doubly terminated crystals, to large, transparent or milky crystals, to late amethystine scepters) and calcite (rhombohedrons, scalenohedrons, platy and hexagonal prisms) are common in most cavities.
4) The great preponderance of mediumsmoky color in gwindels (colorless and very dark "morion" gwindels are very rare, and amethystine gwindels are almost unknown)
Amethystine color is closely connected with a completely different quartz type.
The last (at last) among the Brazilian what's-news is a recent discovery of Japan law-twinned quartz at Santa Maria do Jetiba, Espirito Santo state--in fact, these loose crystals are not only Japan law-twinned, but manage to be sceptered and amethystine as well.
4) The great preponderance of medium-smoky color in gwindels (colorless and very dark "morion" gwindels are very rare, and amethystine gwindels are almost unknown).
Specimens showing the cherished closed gwindels have been found in this area, and a few gwindels found near the peak called les Courtes show something never before seen on gwindels from anywhere: amethystine overgrowths (Gautron, 1999b).
Several types of quartz exist in the miarolitic cavities, including transparent crystals, smoky quartz, milky quartz and amethystine quartz, some with inclusions.
The specimens that impressed me most were a 15-cm group of smoky quartz crystals capped by a small "scepter" of amethystine quartz from Les Droites (the north face of the Mont Blanc massif), Haute Savoie, in the Eric Asselborn collection, and, from the same collection, an exquisite pink fluorite crystal group on smoky quartz.