amine

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amine

(əmēn`, ăm`ēn): see under amino groupamino group,
in chemistry, functional group that consists of a nitrogen atom attached by single bonds to hydrogen atoms, alkyl groups, aryl groups, or a combination of these three. An organic compound that contains an amino group is called an amine.
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amine

[ə′mēn]
(organic chemistry)
One of a class of organic compounds which can be considered to be derived from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogens by functional groups.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups
References in periodicals archive ?
tyrosine (Tyr)} amino acids were analyzed 13..15 amino acids were identified and determined quantitatively from soil samples.
Further we observed that any amino acid which has no direct link with other amino acids, has indirect link through one of R or S.
They found that when a comet hits another object it creates a shock wave that generates molecules that make up amino acids.
Business unit director of DSM Coating Resins Patrick Niels said, "Amino resins are mostly used for solvent-based applications, whereas DSM has decided to focus its activities on coating resins with a lower ecological footprint (such as waterborne, powder, and UV technologies).
Amino Acids are building blocks of the body, form antibodies to combat invading foreign bodies and act as source of energy (Abe and Takayma, 1972).
Estimation of quality of dietary protein Amino acid score
FDA's narrow interpretation of the term "amino acid" in the context of dietary supplement regulation goes beyond this particular petition and will likely apply to the entire dietary supplement industry in the future.
But the team did find amino acids in the rock that are either rare or nonexistent on Earth.
"Amino acids are forming in environments that we really didn't think were possible," Daniel Glavin told Science News.
The shock of the collision heated it to more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit, hot enough that all complex organic molecules like amino acids should have been destroyed, but we found them anyway," said Daniel Glavin of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.
There is strong evidence that ileal, and not fecal, digestibility is the right parameter for correction of the amino acid score.
In laboratory experiments, middle-aged male healthy mice were given drinking water laced with three specific amino acids.