ammonia compressor

ammonia compressor

[ə′mōn·yə kəm′pres·ər]
(mechanical engineering)
A device that decreases the volume of a quantity of gaseous ammonia by the amplification of pressure; used in refrigeration systems.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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According to witnesses, the gas spread when an ice plant worker opened the gate valve of an ammonia compressor.
This resulted, in 1887, in an agreement between L Sterne and Co and the De La Vergne Co of New York City, manufacturer of a steam-powered ammonia compressor. Within three years the sales figures for ammonia compressors exceeded those of emery wheels and springs combined, and L Sterne and Co was established as one of the leading refrigeration firms in Great Britain.
The minibar's refrigeration system is an ammonia compressor with no freon and no moving parts - and it is completely silent.
Carl von Linde's first ammonia compressor was installed in a Trieste brewery in 1876 and ran for 10 years before its first service overhaul with a full working life of 32 years; not bad for a prototype.
By comparison, an ammonia compressor cooled by an evaporative condenser in the summer would have a 3.45 COP.
Based on best case winter conditions with no heat reclaim, a C[O.sub.2] transcritical compressor requires 1.3 hp/ton, which is less efficient than an ammonia compressor in an identical application.
An energy analysis of the cost benefit of operating the heat recovery system, in comparison with using efficient gas-fired boilers for the full heating requirement, showed that the ammonia compressor absorbed power rises from 291 kW to 411 kW.