ammonification


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ammonification

[ə‚män·ə·fə′kā·shən]
(chemistry)
Addition of ammonia or ammonia compounds, especially to the soil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 2 shows that microorganisms 2, 3, 4, and 5 had the ammonification pathway because they had deaminase enzyme, which could change amino acid into ammonia.
In this work, there was a decrease in ammonia during the afternoon period, indicating that the processes photosynthesis and nitrification had predominated over the ammonification process.
Chemical detoxification methods such as use of hydrogen peroxide (Sreenivasa et al., 1967) and calcium hydroxide (Coker et al., 1984), sodium hydroxide and ammonification have been investigated.
Nitrogen removal begins with ammonification, which occurs in the septic tanks.
The meromictic stratification and the substantially hypoxic condition of the monimolimnion surely benefit ammonification, leading to relatively high values of ammonia and phosphates in deep water.
astreoides consists of genes encoding enzymes involved in cycling nitrogen via nitrogen fixation, ammonification, nitrification, and denitrification (Wegley et al, 2007).
Enzymology and bioenergetics of respiratory nitrite ammonification. FEMS Microbiology Reviews.
Biotic transformations of organic N (ammonification to produce [NH.sub.4.sup.+], followed by nitrification to N[O.sub.3.sup.-]) may also occur on leaf surfaces, and assimilation of these ions to bacterial and plant biomass can occur within the plant canopy (Schwarz et al., 2011).
Many different kinds of decay microorganisms participate in ammonification. Nitrifying bacteria oxidize the ammonia to nitrites, and further oxidize the nitrites to nitrates.
This finding can be attributed to ammonification and/or denitrification occurring in the benthos during prolonged anoxic conditions (Mayer et al.