amebocyte

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amebocyte

[ə′mēb·ə‚sīt]
(invertebrate zoology)
One of the wandering ameboid cells in the tissues and fluids of many invertebrates that function in assimilation and excretion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several methods are currently used to measure pyrogens: the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test, the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay, and the in vitro monocyte assays.
Therefore, the micropurified LPSs are compatible with subsequent biological tests (e.g., TNF-[alpha] induction [71], Limulus amoebocyte lysate activity [72]).
The absence of detectable levels of endotoxin in the final solution was verified by a Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay, following the purification process [26].
The removal of endotoxin was confirmed by a Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay (Cat number QCL-1000; BioWhittaker, Walkersville, MD) with sensitivity of 0.005 endotoxin unit (EU)/mL.
The assay consists of a colorless substrate and a proenzyme extracted from amoebocyte cells in the blood of horseshoe crabs.
The endotoxin level in each recombinant protein was measured using a Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) assay and was below 50 IU/mg (Cambrex, East Rutherford, NJ).
Horseshoe crabs' blue blood contains the clotting factor LAL (limulus amoebocyte lysate), which clots when toxins are encountered.
The principle of LAL coagulation assay is based on the fact that endotoxin activates the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate (LAL) pro enzyme, resulting in gel formation.
The Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay for environmental endotoxin levels was adopted as the standard assay of endotoxin detection by the U.S.
For the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay, endotoxin-free magnesium chloride (MgC[l.sub.2]) buffer was added to 6 different lots of Vacutainer tubes: plastic Vacutainer tubes (BD cat #367874, lots #5339582, 6123786, and 6100968) and glass Vacutainer tubes (BD cat #367874, lots #5007997, 5311755, and 6123675).
This species is also gathered for biomedical companies because its copper-containing blood is used to create a pharmaceutical product, Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) that is used to detect pathogenic endotoxins on medical devices and in injectable drugs (Novitsky, 1984; Mikkelsen, 1988; Levin et al., 2003).