amorphous

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amorphous

(of chemicals, rocks, etc.) not having a crystalline structure
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Amorphous

Those forms that do not have a definite or specific shape; or a distinctive crystalline, geometric, angular or curvilinear structure.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

amorphous

[ə′mȯr·fəs]
(physics)
Pertaining to a solid which is noncrystalline, having neither definite form nor structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

amorphous

Said of rock having no crystal structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

amorphous

Unorganized or vague. A lack of structure. For example, the amorphous state of a bit on a rewritable optical disc means that the light from a laser beam will scatter and not be as reflective as a highly structured crystalline bit. Contrast with crystalline. See amorphous silicon, amorphous semiconductor, phase change disc and phase change memory.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Both pristine and SHI irradiated films demonstrate amorphously nanocrystalline composition.
Bur again, attribution is impossible: we could assign it--if we agree to adopt the poem's own bewildering vagueness--to "the Sex"; even more amorphously, we might trace it to some sort of transcendent, sanctified source (after all, it is a "sacred" Rule).
What matters here is words (broadly and finally amorphously defined), and what matters much less is deeds, the "tyranny of things" promoted by scholars such as Chicago's Bill Brown, cultural artifacts, and so forth.
(29) Because the erroneous expectations of at-will employees are rooted in a verifiable factual mistake, they should be fairly easy to correct without recourse to amorphously heightened standards of a "knowing and voluntary" waiver.
(31) For example, some states define specific calendar dates within which an irrigation right can be exercised, while others limit the period of use to an amorphously defined "irrigation season." In the first case, an irrigator having first priority for naturally occurring flows during the months of May to August, but no access to storage, could be vulnerable to a seasonal shift in flow timing that caused the spring freshet to peak a month earlier and summer flows to dwindle.
But the benefit is somewhat opaque, because the state's arts-and-culture sector straddles the line between for-profit and nonprofit and amorphously crosses into businesses ranging from galleries to design firms to rock bands.
Amorphously colorful illustrations enhance the playful verse about the wonders of creativity and the beauty of transforming thought into reality.
A solitary existence is counterpoised with a nocturnal bohemian social life as, in this amorphously nostalgic nineteenth-century, Romantic individualism meets aesthetic decadence.
Spirituality is best identified by its behavioral and relational terms (e.g., love and nonviolence), not by some theologically sanctioned category (e.g., Spirit), assumed to be amorphously present in those who claim it.
(11.) Jackson gives examples of what he considers as multidimensional spatialities, thus: "Thai discourses, for example, are no longer bounded within the borders of the single state called Thailand, but neither do they float amorphously without any boundaries whatsoever across all domains or locales.
As Lin Foxhall has pointed out, in domestic environments "the aggregate of quotidian behaviours and activities can be most dramatically misinterpreted if their remains are read amorphously as a long-term trend.
For her the family was the first community, but "the idea of female communities seems to have been more amorphously glorious" and led to more open, real-world political gatherings.