amperage


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amperage

the magnitude of an electric current measured in amperes, esp the rated current of an electrical component or device

amperage

[′am·prij]
(electricity)
The amount of electric current in amperes. Abbreviated amp.

amperage

The flow of electric current in a circuit, expressed in amperes.
References in periodicals archive ?
From a size and amperage perspective, the PRO 300 replaces Miller's Big Blue 251.
The catalog features 17 sections, including new products and drawings, all featuring electronic data tables that are updated to reflect the latest, most accurate speeds and amperage ratings.
Metaphorically speaking, the system should operate like a master light panel where everyone is using the same energy source (the data) and amperage (processes), but users can switch the lights on or off as needed.
And he claims his enhancement of the spark amperage comes about by using n early the same amount of energy supplied by the OEM ignition system.
Apart from the strategizing, there was the small matter of increasing the amperage after the scheduling lull.
For mixed-amperage applications, panels can be configured-to-order to support varying amperages from a common platform.
Measurements include boiler temperature and pressure, steam rate, turbine inlet, exit temperature and pressure, generator voltage and amperage output.
REGULATOR: Device which maintains the amperage and/or voltage levels of a circuit at pre-determined values.
The smelter will be based around the company's AP50 technology -- a higher amperage (500 kA per cell) development of the company's AP30 technology.
Ceramaseal believes that this feedthrough should handle most common amperage levels for applications in the 13.
During the "amp wars," in which manufacturers increased amperage of their vacuum cleaners and claimed better cleaning effectiveness of higher amperage, returns of uprights surged.
In the battle between alternating current and direct current (see 1883), victory went to alternating current, because it could be transformed into another current of much higher voltage and of correspondingly lower amperage (to get something, you have to give up something in the real world).