Amphiumidae

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Amphiumidae

[‚am·fē′yü·mə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A small family of urodele amphibians in the suborder Salamandroidea composed of three species of large, eellike salamanders with tiny limbs.
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The word amphiuma comes from the Greek amphi, meaning "on both sides," and pneuma, meaning "breathe," based on a misconception that the salamander can breathe both air and water.
But we were a little surprised when we found several amphiumas in the minnow traps we'd set in the pond the previous day."
This specimen was located roughly 140 km due west of the original find by George Spangler of an amphiuma in Indiana at Jeffersonville (Minton 1972).
Observations on a population of the salamander, Amphiuma tridactylum Cuvier.
A new proteocephalid from Amphiuma tridactylum Cuvier.
During June of 1941 Riser, from the Illinois Institute of Technology and working independent of RLBS scholarship support, recovered and later described Ophiotaenia alternans a new species of proteocephalid tapeworm from the small intestine of a three-toed amphiuma. In a review of proteocephalid tapeworms from North American reptiles and amphibians, Brooks (1978) accepted the validity of O.
Species BH SH MX UP Total Salamanders Eurycea quadridigitata -- -- -- 02 02 Ambystoma maculatum 02 06 03 02 13 Ambystoma opacum 03 32 05 06 46 Ambystoma talpoideum 11 07 -- 05 23 Amphiuma tridactylum 01 -- -- -- 01 Siren intermedia 18 -- -- -- 18 No.
Amphiuma is a genus of large eel-like aquatic salamanders that can be found in nearly any lentic waters in their range, which extends from eastern Texas eastward along the coastal region of the Gulf of Mexico and up the Atlantic Coast to eastern Virginia (Conant and Collins, 1998).
Amphiuma tridactylum is generally considered to be nocturnal, with a peak of activity in the hours leading to midnight (Cagle, 1948).
Here we describe two relatively well-preserved Amphiuma vertebrae from the site, and illustrate and discuss vertebral characters and structures that clearly separate this taxon from those of the other North American aquatic eel-like salamanders of the family Sirenidae.
Fossil History of Amphiuma -- Although the fossil record of the paedomorphic salamander genus Amphiuma is limited, it dates back to the late Paleocene (8), approximately 54 Ma B.P.
Amphiumas' legs are small and weak, but their jaws sure aren't.