amplitude

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amplitude

(ăm`plĭto͞od'), in physics, maximum displacement from a zero value or rest position. In the harmonic motionharmonic motion,
regular vibration in which the acceleration of the vibrating object is directly proportional to the displacement of the object from its equilibrium position but oppositely directed.
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 of a pendulum, the amplitude of the swing is the greatest distance reached to either side of the central rest position. Amplitude is important in the description of a wavewave,
in physics, the transfer of energy by the regular vibration, or oscillatory motion, either of some material medium or by the variation in magnitude of the field vectors of an electromagnetic field (see electromagnetic radiation).
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 phenomenon such as light or sound. In general, the greater the amplitude of the wave, the more energy it transmits (e.g., a brighter light or a louder sound).

amplitude

1. Symbol: δm . The difference between the maximum and minimum magnitudes of a variable star, i.e. the range in magnitude of the star. The amplitude of pulsating variables is related to the logarithm of the period.
2. The maximum instantaneous deviation of an oscillating quantity from its average value.

amplitude

[′am·plə‚tüd]
(astronomy)
The range in brightness of a variable star, usually expressed in magnitudes.
(mathematics)
The angle between a vector representing a specified complex number on an Argand diagram and the positive real axis. Also argument.
(navigation)
Angular distance north or south of the prime vertical; the arc of the horizon, or the angle at the zenith between the prime vertical and a vertical circle, measured north or south from the prime vertical to the vertical circle.
(physics)
The maximum absolute value attained by the disturbance of a wave or by any quantity that varies periodically.

amplitude

Of oscillation or vibration, the maximum displacement from the mean position.

amplitude

amplitudeclick for a larger image
i. The amplitude of a wave is the maximum displacement, or the maximum value, it attains from its mean position during a cycle. It is both positive and negative. With sound waves, the greater the amplitude, the louder is the sound.
ii. Angular distance north or south of the prime vertical; the arc of the horizon or the angle at the zenith between the prime vertical and a vertical circle, measured north or south from the prime vertical circle. The term is used customarily only to refer to bodies whose centers are on the celestial horizon and is prefixed “E” or “W” as the body is rising or setting, respectively, and suffixed “N” or “S” to agree with the declination.

amplitude

1. Astronomy the angular distance along the horizon measured from true east or west to the point of intersection of the vertical circle passing through a celestial body
2. Maths (of a complex number) the angle that the vector representing the complex number makes with the positive real axis. If the point (x, y) has polar coordinates (r, θ), the amplitude of x + iy is θ, that is, arctan y/x
3. Physics the maximum variation from the zero or mean value of a periodically varying quantity

amplitude

The strength or volume of a signal, usually measured in decibels. See wavelength.


Amplitude
The amplitude is the power of a signal. The greater the amplitude, the greater the energy carried.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [[sigma].sub.p] and [[sigma].sub.i] represent the peak stress and initial stress amplitudes, respectively, for given strain amplitude.
In fact, the measured signal instability during the acquisition of the samples could be treated as amplitude or frequency modulation and modulation produces spectral lines around the measured signal's spectral line.
The amplitude amplification will be measured through the waves' Maximal Temporal Amplitude (MTA), a quantity measuring the highest elevation at every spatial position in the domain during the observation time.
Two-way repeated measures ANOVA revealed the significant effect of intervention [F(1,11) = 6.98, P = 0.023, partial [[eta].sup.2] = 0.388] and time [F(5,55) =2.98, P = 0.019, partial [[eta].sup.2] = 0.213] on MEP amplitudes. In addition, there was a significant interaction between intervention and time [F(5,55) =4.01, P = 0.004, partial [[eta].sup.2] = 0.267].
Figure 4 shows the dependence of the reduced complex viscosity on the reduced frequency of the decrosslinked XHDPE obtained from TSE using the compounding screws without ultrasonic treatment (a), with ultrasonic treatment at an amplitude of 10 [micro]m (b) and using the decrosslinking screws without ultrasonic treatment (c), with ultrasonic treatment at amplitudes of 10 [micro]m, (d) and 13 [micro]m, (e) at a flow rate of 6.5 g/min at a reference temperature of 160[degrees]C.
There was a marked inter-individual variability in amplitudes of N75 to P100 in both patients with diabetes and control subjects.
Simulation results of the friction loss, POFP and MOFT of the bearings with different roundness amplitudes at the roundness phase of 67[degrees] and 157[degrees] are shown in Figure 5.
The average current and dither amplitude in low frequency PWM cannot be controlled independently.
Caption: Figure 7: Optimized array excitation amplitudes using IA-CP method.
Caption: FIGURE 8: Comparison of the relative change of resonant frequencies and vibrational amplitudes under different thickness of piezoelectrodes between experiments and simulations.
The above results indicate that the S0 and A0 amplitudes can reflect the w change of fractured long bones with different angles.
The additional vibrating movement of the reed has significantly lower amplitude and higher frequency comparing to the basic movement of the reed resulting from the movement of the slay [1].