ampulla

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ampulla

1. Anatomy the dilated end part of certain ducts or canals, such as the end of a uterine tube
2. Christianity
a. a vessel for containing the wine and water used at the Eucharist
b. a small flask for containing consecrated oil
3. a Roman two-handled bottle for oil, wine, or perfume

ampulla

[am′pu̇l·ə]
(anatomy)
A dilated segment of a gland or tubule.
(botany)
A small air bladder in some aquatic plants.
(invertebrate zoology)
The sac at the base of a tube foot in certain echinoderms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Botrylloides leachii WBR has been reported to start with the healing of the injury sites to prevent further hemolymph loss, followed by the compaction of the marginal ampullae toward the center of the remaining matrix.
In ampullae of the vas deferens, interstitial and intraluminal inflammatory infiltrate (Figure 8(d)), mild to severe diffuse mononuclear interstitial infiltrate, multifocal neutrophilic intraepithelial infiltrate, and glandular hyperplasia were observed.
The response of the ampullae of Lorenzini of elasmobranchs to electrical stimulation.
Main Concept: (See Level D.) Some electroreceptive animals sense electric charges with sensors called Ampullae of Lorenzini.
The contents of the inner ear are removed, including the otolithic organs, especially the utricle with its attached ampullae beneath the horizontal fallopian canal.
Mary Magdalen from Bethany to Vezelay; a relic exhibition at Aachen that included the shift that the Virgin had worn on the night of the nativity and Christ's swaddling-bands; ampullae filled with a solution of the blood of Thomas Becket, which could effect cures.
These senses include (1) smell and taste (chemoreception); (2) vision (photoreception); (3) hearing, touch, and a lateral line system (mechanoreception); and (4) ampullae of Lorenzini (electroreception).
It includes not only generous annotations, but also two appendices (one on ampullae portraying Thecla, another on the popularity of Thecla as a woman's name in late antique Egypt), over thirty pages of maps and photographs, and a full bibliography.
While receptor hair cells in the ampullae of the semi-circular canals respond to rotatory or angular acceleration of the head, the utricle and saccule (collectively referred to as the `otoliths') respond to linear acceleration (including linear acceleration by gravity).
Oil from the lamps which burned at this site was highly prized by pilgrims as an eulogia or "blessing," and they carried it away in small metal phials known as ampullae. A number of these are today preserved in the cathedral treasury at Monza in Italy, their exteriors decorated with images of the Crucifixion and the Anastasis shrine.