amyloglucosidase


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Related to amyloglucosidase: amylase, glucoamylase

amyloglucosidase

[‚am·ə·lō‚glü′kō·sə‚dās]
(food engineering)
An enzyme of microbial origin that breaks glucoside bonds in starch and dextrins to form glucose; used in the manufacturing of glucose and for converting carbohydrates to fermentable sugars (as in beer-brewing). Also known as glucoamylase.
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After cooling, contents were again incubated with addition of 100 [micro]L protease enzyme at 60[degrees]C for 30 min and then the contents were incubated with amyloglucosidase enzyme at 60[degrees]C for 30 min.
Pearce and Bauchop (1985) studied an amyloglucosidase from Neocallimastix frontalis, which produced glucose as the only product from starch.
The degree of gelatinization of the starch of the experimental diets was determined by the amyloglucosidase method (SA et al.
Damaged starch (DS) was determined by a method based on the evaluation of susceptibility to amyloglucosidase hydrolysis [16].
Homogenates of adult mussels were heated to boiling point, digested with amyloglucosidase for 16 h at 20[degrees]C in a pH 4.
amyloglucosidase from Aspergillus niger and [alpha]-amylase from Bacillus amyloliquefasciens were from Boehringer Mannheim.
The enzymes used for the hydrolysis of starch were [alpha]-amylase (Termamyl 120L) and amyloglucosidase (AMG 200L), provided by Novozymes[R] (Denmark).
Glycogen in the supernatant fraction was enzymically hydrolyzed to glucose by incubation with amyloglucosidase (A107823, AladdinPMI, Seattle, WA, USA) in acetate buffer (pH 4.
niger comes primarily from its use in the food industry and for the production of amylase amyloglucosidase cellulases lactase invertase pectinases and acid proteases (Ward 1989; Bennett and Klich 1992; Andersen et al.
Biosynthesis of amyloglucosidase by Aspergillus niger using wheat bran as substrate.
After digestion with amylase and amyloglucosidase, the water-soluble fraction of glutarate starch had more oligosaccharides resistant to digestive enzymes than did native adlay starch.