amylose


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amylose

[′am·ə‚lōs]
(biochemistry)
A linear starch polymer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Filipinos prefer rice varieties with intermediate amylose content and soft gel consistency.
A breakthrough came when they identified two particular enzymes, that when reduced in wheat, increased the amylose content.
It has shown that nitrogen fertilizer aids protein accumulation in rice grains and restrains amylose accumulation, and gives higher brown rice gel consistency (Hao et al.
The total solids in the cassava starch fermentation wastewater are probably comprised of hydrolyzed amylose and amylopectin molecules, besides organic acids and residual microorganism cells.
Amylose and amylopectin were assessed according to the methodology of the American Association of Cereal Chemists (AACC, 2001).
Except for one, all the other hybrids showed significant negative value of cytoplasmic effect for amylose content.
The starchy white amylose powder is actually healthier than the starches used in food production today, which currently provide 50 to 60 percent of the calories needed by humans to survive.
Development of CSPs based on cellulose and amylose derivatives
Granule Bound Starch Syntheses (waxy proteins) are the only enzyme that has a role in amylose synthesis in wheat [1, 2].
1958) determined critical surface tensions for wetting of 35-39N/m for starch, amylose and amylopectin films, 40 N/m for amylose triacetate and approximately 32 N/m for starch tributyrate.
Generally, both amylose content and chain-length distribution of amylopectin chains in starches exerts significant influence on the defectiveness of the crystalline lamellae through an alteration of their structural organization [3-4].