anaerobic sediment

anaerobic sediment

[¦an·ə¦rōb·ik ′sed·ə·mənt]
(geology)
A highly organic sediment formed in the absence or near absence of oxygen in water that is rich in hydrogen sulfide.
References in periodicals archive ?
The graphite can be placed in a stream or pond that has a layer of anaerobic sediment on the bottom.
Anaerobic sediment was collected using a box corer and transferred to canning jars, which were filled to capacity and stored at 4[degrees]C until used (within ~3 months).
The anaerobic sediment is laced with bacteria-producing poisonous gases, The anaerobic bacteria cannot live in an oxygen-filled environment so the anaerobic bacteria closest to the surface of the sediment will die and be eaten by the aerobic bacteria which have been happily growing in the oxygen-rich aerated water.
Metal toxicity on the dechlorination of monochlorophenols in fresh and acclimated anaerobic sediment slurries.
The commercial PCB mixtures Aroclor 1242 and Aroclor 1254 were incubated in anaerobic sediment slurries inoculated with PCB-dechlorinating microorganisms eluted from PCB-contaminated upper Hudson River (HR) sediments, using methods previously described (34).
Organic Matter Mineralization with Reduction of Ferric Iron in Anaerobic Sediments.
Especially in sensitive freshwaters, with low current velocities and prevailing anaerobic sediments, use of creosote-treated wood is strongly discouraged," she wrote.
One and Two are partially buried in fine anaerobic sediments at the bottom of the lake and give you the impression of being quite solid, but that's underwater.
Contrary to anaerobic sediments where PhPs may preserve for a long period, the aerobic degradation of PhPs in the water column is usually very rapid and extensive (Leavitt & Carpenter 1990a, 1990b; Leavitt 1993; Patoine & Leavitt 2006).
Where biodeposits are incorporated in aerobic surficial sediments that overlay deeper anaerobic sediments, microbially mediated, coupled nitrification--denitrification can permanently remove N from the sediments as [N.
Most AVS occurs naturally in the form of solid FeS in anaerobic sediments underlying many bodies of water.
As well as `irrigating' the sediments with oxygen, the deposit feeders help to mix ammonia and nitrate into usually anaerobic sediments, and their faecal pellets encourage the presence of bacteria.