threshold

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Related to Anaerobic threshold: VO2 max

threshold

1. Psychol the strength at which a stimulus is just perceived
2. 
a. the minimum intensity or value of a signal, etc., that will produce a response or specified effect
b. (as modifier): a threshold current

Threshold

A strip fastened to the floor beneath a door, to cover the joint where two types of floor materials meet or to provide weather protection.

What does it mean when you dream about a threshold?

A threshold is a symbol for passing from one state or condition to the next, indicating a transition in some aspect of the dreamer’s life.

threshold

[′thresh‚hōld]
(building construction)
A piece of stone, wood, or metal that lies under an outside door.
(electronics)
In a modulation system, the smallest value of carrier-to-noise ratio at the input to the demodulator for all values above which a small percentage change in the input carrier-to-noise ratio produces a substantially equal or smaller percentage change in the output signal-to-noise ratio.
(engineering)
The least value of a current, voltage, or other quantity that produces the minimum detectable response in an instrument or system.
(geology)
(mathematics)
A logic operator such that, if P, Q, R, S, … are statements, then the threshold will be true if at least N statements are true, false otherwise.
(physics)
The minimum level of some input quantity needed for some process to take place, such as a threshold energy for a reaction, or the minimum level of pumping at which a laser can go into self-excited oscillation.
(physiology)
The minimum level of a stimulus that will evoke a response in an irritable tissue.

threshold

1. A strip fastened to the floor beneath a door, usually required to cover the joint where two types of floor material meet; may provide weather protection at exterior doors. Also See doorsill.
2. In illumination engineering, the value of physical stimulus which permits an object to be seen a specified percentage of the time with specified accuracy.

threshold

threshold
The beginning of that portion of the runway usable for landing (ICAO). On instrument runways, it is indicated by long stripes followed by the runway designation marking. The number of stripes is dependent on the width of the runway.

threshold

(1) The point at which a signal (voltage, current, etc.) is perceived as valid.

(2) (Threshold) The code name for Windows 10.
References in periodicals archive ?
Helgerud, "Maximal oxygen uptake, anaerobic threshold and running economy in women and men with similar performances level in marathons," European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol.
Caption: Figure 5: [VO.sub.2] at the Anaerobic Threshold, T1 (p = 0.8, [CI 95%: -0,23-0,29]) and T2 (p = 0.02, [CI 95%: -0,70--0,06]).
Since soccer is a relatively high intensive physical activity so it is not surprising that the reduction in aerobic power, anaerobic power, percentage of maximum oxygen consumption at anaerobic threshold, fat percentage, agility, speed, flexibility, weight and height can cause dysfunction in neurological-muscular and support systems and undermine the performance of the athletes.
In a recent study which retrospectively examined the prognostic value of CPET in 63 patients with IPF, results showed that increased ventilation at anaerobic threshold (AT) as reflected by higher VE/V[O.sub.2] at AT was a major prognostic factor of death [24].
Anaerobic threshold: review of the concept and directions for future research.
Traditionally, the point of anaerobic threshold was determined by noting an increase in the blood lactate level of the exercising patient, and the term lactate threshold was often used in place of anaerobic threshold.
The concept of the 'anaerobic threshold', although still popular today among certain coaches and exercise scientists, was disproved less than a decade after its inception by George Brooks and his colleagues at the University of California (see review paper (5)).
(2) In these cases, oxygen uptake (V[O.sub.2]) will raise over the anaerobic threshold (AT) point.
Trained athletes accumulate less lactic acid at a given level of intensity than unfit people do because they've raised their anaerobic threshold. That is, they've enhanced the capacity of the heart and blood vessels to deliver oxygen to the muscles and remove carbon dioxide.
--Aerobic Training in Water Group (ATW, n=7): The animals were submitted to the critical load test to determine the training load, and then performed aerobic training in the aquatic environment for 30 minutes, three times a week, with an intensity corresponding to 70% of the anaerobic threshold with a water temperature of 30[degrees] C ([+ or -] 1).
They stated that due to the similarity between the breakage point of blood and salivary lactate and heart rate, by taking a look at the heart rate curves, one can subjectively determine the anaerobic threshold.