anagram

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anagram

[Gr.,=something read backward], rearrangement of the letters of a word or words to make another word or other words. A famous Latin anagram was an answer made out of a question asked by Pilate. The question was Quid est veritas? [What is truth?], and the answer Est vir qui adest [it is the man who is here]. An anagram that reads the same backward as forward is a palindrome, e.g., "Able was I ere I saw Elba."
References in periodicals archive ?
After he is rescued and reflects on the anagrammatical rationale of the Mallit/Khallit puzzle, Eagle realizes that the way out, based on a pun told him by the trickster figure Deggle many years earlier, was before him all the time: "Ethiopia .
In a structural analogue to the anagrammatical snare of Mallit/Khallit, Flapping Eagle must then search for the symptoms that reveal Grimus's presence while resisting the powerful temptation to succumb to the comforting oblivion of K's perpetual here-and-now.
That Dido is "madding" means, to be sure, that she has come a bit unhinged in her love for Aeneas, but, at the same time, the word serves to place the name of Dido, queen of diamonds, securely within the anagrammatical motif of the diamond female.
Fire is an integral part of diamond imagery, as is the play of the letters and syllables of the diamond anagrammatical motif.
The diamond anagrammatical assemblage may again be indicated here.
His inquiry whether Miranda be "maid or no" (ADIMNOR) contains all the letters of diamond, and therefore registers the anagrammatical motif (495).
Emma is even in a high location, but the ideal is immediately punctured by the anagrammatical dirtiness that lurks beneath every one of Emma's 'positive' experiences: 'Ils etaient sur les hauteurs de Thibourville [.
Peter Newby sent this anagrammatical ode in which each line has an end-rhyme that does something else, too.
Caliban pronounces the name Setebos, with its rich anagrammatical potential to be read as so betes, eight times throughout the poem, almost the exact same number of times that Caliban puts forward his "seven theses or propositions, each ending in analogy with 'So He.