anal sphincter


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anal sphincter

[′ān·əl ′sfiŋk·tər]
(anatomy)
Either of two muscles, one voluntary and the other involuntary, controlling closing of the anus in vertebrates.
References in periodicals archive ?
It had long been thought that constipation following obstetric anal sphincter injury allowed the sphincter to heal more effectively.
Women with anal sphincter lacerations tended to have more codes, however, with a range of 2.
13) Ours is the first study to use both questionnaires together showing that an improvement in the function of the anal sphincter correlates with an improvement in quality of life.
The question is whether the urethral sphincter may be reconstructed after longitudinal injury similar to anal sphincter injuries.
Indeed, obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS), (1) with their short-and long-term consequences, merit clinical attention, as spotlighted in Dr.
Materials and Methods: Two hundred healthy female patients with no history of anal sphincter injury, aged between 18 and 70 years were included in the study The participants were divided into 4 groups according to their menopausal stages and mode of delivery; premenopausal (group 1) and postmenopausal (group 2) vaginal delivery, and premenopausal (group 3) and postmenopausal (group 4) cesarean section.
As such surgery should be avoided since anal sphincter repair is very difficult.
One of the major causes of fecal incontinence in women is vaginal delivery, resulting in anal sphincter injury.
Fecal incontinence can occur when an individual has diarrhea, abnormal rectal compliance, anal sphincter dysfunction, an inability to perceive or respond to the defecation urge, or incomplete emptying of the rectum during defecation.
The aim in treating fistula in Ano is 3 folds viz identification of the tract, identification of the internal opening and preservation of the anal sphincter.
Background: Obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIS) can cause an adverse impact on women's physical and mental health.