analog film


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Related to analog film: Analog video

analog film

A plastic sheet with a photosensitive emulsion that comes in various formats for still and video cameras. When exposed to light, plastic-based film creates an "analog" of the actual scene. Film was never called analog until digital cameras came on the scene.

Analog Resolution
Analog film has a greater resolution than most digital camera images. For example, a 35mm analog frame may resolve up to 6,000 lines. Although digital IMAX theater cameras reach 7,000 lines, consumer HD camcorders record only 1080 lines. The granularity of analog film is based on the emulsion molecule size. The granularity of digital images is based on the number of horizontal and vertical pixels in the sensor. See digital camera and digital photography.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most often, however, compounded screens employ an uneasy mise-en-abyme effect that challenges viewers' expectations of analog film aesthetics.
This combination of incompatible elements within a single shot--whether a soundtrack unfaithful to aural expectations, two distinct film speeds, or three-dimensional set pieces against two-dimensional rear projection disrupts the illusory spatial and temporal integrity of the analog film diegesis.
"Consumers seem very receptive to the concept of seeing film for digital cameras alongside traditional analog film. In addition, low prices of the cards mean that people are more likely to save the images on the cards themselves, rather than transferring them to a computer, thus providing an incentive to purchase more cards when they need them.
UNLIKE DIGITAL FORMATS, analog film is a known entity to archivists, who, over the past century, have learned how to deal with it.
Performance art, social practice, assemblage-based sculpture, painting on canvas, the "archival impulse," analog film, and the fascination with modernist design and architecture: At first glance, none of these formats appear to have anything to do with digital media, and when they are discussed, it is typically in relation to previous artistic practices across the twentieth century.
The use of analog film, typical of Thyn's photographic work, on the one hand questions the significance of documenting an already existing artwork and the consequences of this process, while on the other it aspires to test and overcome the limits of photography as such.
Was it simply because of shared concerns and because these artists, like her, use analog film? Or might an artist be drawn to a work because something about it is distant from her own practice?
Digitization of prior analog films assists study comparison.
For example, existing analog films can be digitized into the filmless system.
In the era of digital manipulation and high-tech special effects, Lutz's silent analog films, with their handmade look, may seem old-fashioned, but they are highly inventive and visually multilayered, enriched by the use of double and triple exposures, a wide variety of lenses, and rear projections.