analysand


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analysand

[ə′nal·ə‚zand]
(psychology)
An individual in psychoanalytic treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather than attempt to draw distinctions between empathy and identification (Bondi, 2003)--between forms of relating to the other that respect their alterity and forms that "colonize" it--the Lacanian response is to argue that all these relations fall under the rubric of the imaginary--relations between egos--and to insist that the solution lies in resituating the relation (between analyst and analysand or between researcher and researched) in the symbolic.
It is here the analysand faces his fantasy as a last defence mechanism against the real, unreachable object of his desire, a defence mechanism which is at the same time desire's final support.
For Brooks transference is "at once the drive to make the story of the past present--to actualize past desire, and the countervailing pressure to make the history of this past definitively past: to make an end to its reproductive insistence in the present, to lead the analysand to the understanding that this past is indeed past, and then to incorporate this past as past, so that the life's story can once again progress" (227-228).
The punch line is that they experience the same things, whether they cover life up with ego strategies or confront life like an analysand.
He was famously dismissive of Freudian psychology, comparing an analysand to a drunk man staring at crumbs on his waistcoat, lost in self-absorption.
In the context of psychoanalysis, this involves the temporal and contingent "dialogue" between the analyst and the analysand at the level of desire--although not desire for each other.
In effect, both Kierkegaard and Lacan wish to bring about trauma--a wound or break--in the reader or analysand, an encounter that can facilitate existential appropriation of the kind of truth capable of providing renewed meaning and opening new possibilities.
When the analysand exposes such illusion himself, he grows in wisdom, not least by the acknowledgment that he unconsciously chose that illusory good and has clung to it all the while.
The subject in question is the analysand, who retroactively constructs his/her own history in his/her own way.
The analysand evokes certain responses in the analyst, while the analyst's own conflicts and internal self-and-object representations determine the final shape of the countertransference response.
She offers a fascinating account of how the latent, contest of interpretation between analyst and analysand around the primal scene is replicated in Freud's relation to his intellectual heirs, especially Jung (59-79).
In Shoshana Felman and Dori Laub's landmark study Testimony: Crises of Witnessing in Literature, Psychoanalysis, and History, for example, the relationship between the witness and the listener/reader is based on that between the analysand and the analyst in the psychoanalytic situation.