analysand

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analysand

[ə′nal·ə‚zand]
(psychology)
An individual in psychoanalytic treatment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Recall that transference is the repetition of earlier relationships within the space of analysis--a common manifestation of which might be the analysand treating the analyst as he or she does the parent of the same gender.
The goal of an analysis is not to deprive analysands of all enjoyment, but to dissipate the enjoyment they derive from their symptoms, an enjoyment they are generally conflicted about (or to transform their way of seeing that enjoyment so that they are no longer conflicted about it).
When the analysand exposes such illusion himself, he grows in wisdom, not least by the acknowledgment that he unconsciously chose that illusory good and has clung to it all the while.
The analysands were able to live a new and smooth relational experience once the analyst could bear their sensations, feelings, and discharges.
Rather the claim is verified, or not, by the procedure known as the passe, in which an analysand testifies to the nature of her experience before two other analysands, known as passers, who in turn transmit this testimony to a group of others known as "the cartel of the pass" (Tillet 2001, 130).
It seems that, in their ambivalence, analysands hope simultaneously to get rid of their problems and to hang on to them.
In other words, like the parent-child bond, the analytic relationship is a sacred haven in which analysands have a second chance to realize their vitality and authenticity potentials.
In chapter 5, Stroud argues that such an analysis is unavailable, since for an analysis to be successful it must be impossible for the analysandum to occur without the analysands.
They have been ignored for so long by so many, he maintains, because of the docility of analysands and the tendentiousness of the psychoanalytic establishment.
Characters are driven compulsively back to unresolved tensions or unanswered questions from their pasts, and when resolutions are achieved, Brookner's protagonists are released into the ordinary unhappiness to which Freud consigned his successful analysands.
Among analysands of the past fifty years, there is a common form of psychopathology which differs significantly from the symptom-laden hysterias and obsessional neuroses Freud treated.
Baudelaire's poem, "The Giantess," is a response to one of my analysands who, this morning, arrived at his session after a scene he witnessed yesterday that left him scarcely able to believe his eyes, moved and also troubled.