Anath

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Anath

(ā`năth), in the Bible, father of ShamgarShamgar
, in Judges, deliverer and apparently a judge of Israel. He slew 600 Philistines with an ox goad.
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Anat fights mainly humans and is Baal's "corresponding divine warrior on the earthly level" (p.
(ABM, Pterosiphonia, Rhodophyceae, ESP, Anat, Bio).
As an active Women of the Wall (WOW) supporter, I appreciated Daphna Berman's article about Anat Hoffman ("Anat Hoffman Dares to Take on Israel's Orthodox Establishment.
The heart-rending picture of Anat Hoffman clasping a Torah Scroll is just part of a pantomime.
SWEIDA, (SANA) -- Al- Anat town in Sweida province is an archeological site which was built in the Nabataean era, it was a station for 13 ancient commercial centers.
Anat Hoffman, who is the leader of Women of the Wall, a group that has been organizing monthly prayer services at the Kotel for the past 24 years, was thrown in jail by Jerusalem police acting on behalf of religious authorities who monitor the holy site.
Uri Blau s'etait vu confier des milliers de documents confidentiels voles a l'armee israelienne par une soldate, Anat Kamm.
So far, Malachi has benefited substantially from the Anat Baniel Method of treatment, which uses gentle movement to help very young children with brain injuries - such as the strokes that lead to cerebral palsy - create new brain-body neural pathways while their nervous systems still are pliable.
Threat: Palestinian Political Prisoners in Isreal, edited by Abeer Baker and Anat Matar.
Walton-born John Falding told the ECHO he hoped the end of the five-month inquiry would allow him to concentrate on his memories of partner Anat Rosenberg, who died in the Tavistock Square bus bombing.
Aschheim, "Reflections on Theatricality, Identity, and the Modern Jewish Experience" (21-38); Peter Jelavich, "How 'Jewish' Was Theatre in Imperial Berlin" (39-58); Anat Feinberg, "Stagestruck: Jewish Attitudes to the Theatre in Wilhelmine Germany" (59-76); Delphine Bechtel, "Yiddish Theatre and Its Impact on the German and Austrian Stage" (77-98); Bernhard Greiner, "German and Jewish 'Theatromania': Theodor Lessing's Theater-Seele between Goethe and Kafka" (99-115); Peter W.