anchor pattern

anchor pattern

[′aŋ·kər ‚pad·ərn]
(metallurgy)
The pattern of minute projections formed on a metal surface by sandblasting, shot blasting, or chemical etching; used to enhance the adhesiveness of a surface coating.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increasing substrate surface area, by sand blasting, or chemical etching, can improve adhesion, but only if the coating wets the resulting anchor pattern. Poor wetting of the surface profile can create voids at the interface which allows the condensation of moisture and sets up corrosion cells.
Preferred method: hydro demo (40,000 psi) every square inch of the original plaster surface to remove all organics, paint, weak plaster and remove with vacuum, to create a superior anchor pattern for the new pool finish.
For our plants to be better able to control this process the industry is in need of a system that could automatically read the anchor pattern and let the operator know what is going on with the profile at all times, yet maintaining the blast cleaning requirements.
In order to achieve the surface key or anchor pattern necessary to accept HTC's distinctive red polyurethane coating, blast cleaning is essential, so when the company moved to larger premises in Sheffield, one of the earliest decisions taken was to install a purpose built blast room and paint spray facility.
Table 1 Prototype for Career Anchor Pattern Asssessment Autonomy Entrepreneurship Status Changes in Little Changes to Higher Wage or-salaried Status Frequent Employment Moves Firm Sales Show Typically No Typically Yes Substantial Growth (esp.
With the new installation, tubes are automatically and individually fed via an in-feed diablo roller conveyor into the shotblast machine which removes any light miliscale and produces an anchor pattern suitable for subsequent coating.
A high pressure water jet system was used to remove the old coal tar enamel coating, followed by a line travel blast machine that used a combination of shot and grit to clean the pipe surface to SA 2.5/ near white metal blast and with a 2 to 4 mil anchor pattern. Many leaders in the field of coating application agree that correct surface preparation is the single most important factor in the success or failure of a protective coating application.
All pipeline company specifications call for shot blast cleaning with typically a near-white or white metal finish and a defined anchor pattern profile for the application of external corrosion coatings.