anchorite

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anchorite

a person who lives in seclusion, esp a religious recluse; hermit
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

anchorite

[′aŋ·kə‚rīt]
(petrology)
A variety of diorite having nodules of mafic minerals and veins of felsic minerals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author warns that "[??]e ancre be wearnde anober a cwaer to lane, f[e]or ha hefde heoneward hire bileaue ehe" (21) ("The anchoress who refused another a quire on loan would have the eye of her faith turned far from here" (22)), and further advises that
Sarah occupies her time saying prayers and reading her Rule, a holy text meant to explain her responsibilities as an anchoress and reinforce her devotion.
Her vocations as an anchoress and as a writer have much in common with the vocations of artists.
The anchorhold is the most internal and private space and in many ways mirrors the body of the anchoress who inhabits it.
(24.) Caviness, "Anchoress, Abbess, and Queen," 11; and "To See, Hear, and Know All at Once," 124.
Her religious pronouncements take on more drama, thanks to the illuminating instruction she receives from the Anchoress Juliana of Norwich (played by that living saint of comic delivery, Marylouise Burke).
In a state of unio mystica the anchoress says: Now I am a garden of scents I am a flower opening in my bride- groom's heart
Paxton, Frederick S., trans., Anchoress & Abbess in Ninth-Century Saxon.
This was the case, for example, for the life of the early medieval anchoress Saint Ida of Herzfeld for Westphalia, or for the eleventh-century founder of the Carthusians, Saint Bruno for Cologne.
There is the gentle statue of the Virgin which hypnotizes the teenage Christine and inspires her to have herself walled up in Anchoress (Chris Newby, 1993).
For me, the most fascinating part of the book was the depiction of Juliana, an anchoress at the priory.