anchorite

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anchorite

a person who lives in seclusion, esp a religious recluse; hermit

anchorite

[′aŋ·kə‚rīt]
(petrology)
A variety of diorite having nodules of mafic minerals and veins of felsic minerals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sarah occupies her time saying prayers and reading her Rule, a holy text meant to explain her responsibilities as an anchoress and reinforce her devotion.
metamorphosis into an anchoress, the process actually commenced two
For a discussion of these issues in relation to the life of an anchoress, see Rhetoric of the Anchorhold: Space, Place and Body within the Discourses of Enclosure, ed.
Abstract: This paper argues that the twelfth century English anchoress Christina of Markyate engages in a particular form of iconicity that cannot be adequately analyzed using only the current terms of iconography.
One can assume, however, that by embracing the life of an anchoress, Julian led a chaste life in the anchorhold of Norwich and was attentive to the instructional texts and patristic writings concerning the type of life that was required of those in her position.
But when the English anchoress Julian of Norwich insists, "I am a woman, uneducated, feeble, and frail," her feminine humility makes her not only the conduit for God's word, but ultimately a "powerful strategy for self-authorization" (p.
Ancrene Wisse, a guide for anchoresses written in the early thirteenth century, (1) uses a number of provocative images to describe and theorize the small cell in which the anchoress was to enclose herself for life.
A 20th Century anchoress, a modern equivalent of Julian of Norwich, her paintings echo Julian's saying 'Sin is behovely, but all shall be well and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well'.
Mary gave up public preaching and became an anchoress, living a life of prayer and "meditation in a remote cave".
It takes the form of the story of the Montreal anchoress Jeanne Le Ber, who for years has willfully immured, indeed entombed herself, in a church cell, to universally inspiring effect.
Julian Norwich, Revelations of Divine Love: A Book of Showings to the Anchoress Julian of Norwich, ed.