anchorite


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anchorite

a person who lives in seclusion, esp a religious recluse; hermit
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

anchorite

[′aŋ·kə‚rīt]
(petrology)
A variety of diorite having nodules of mafic minerals and veins of felsic minerals.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The council's cabinet member for environment, Councillor Karen Shore, said: "To allow the work to be carried out safely the footpath from St John's next to the Anchorite Cell will be closed and a diversion will be signposted.
Anchorites, monastic women who lived hermetic lives in tiny cells attached to churches, routinely kept cats.
The anchorite's cell is positioned within the narrative as a space of spiritual and emotional conversion, literally transforming 'wo' to 'wel' or joy--here, to 'welcome'.
(53) The notion that a lost street or a silent, black-and-white puddle might suddenly open up a gate between the material and the spiritual takes us back to ancient icon-makers and to anchorites' visions, a contingent world of physical bodies rooted in the darkness, yet staring up at the immaterial light--which is to say, the world of cinema itself.
(33) Three late medieval versions of the wild man--the hairy anchorite, the mocking minstrel-knight, and the wild knight (milites silvani)--became popular figures in chivalric and sentimental narratives, and the objects of awed admiration in court masques.
Siglind Bruhn, writing about the opera Mathis der Maler, compared Hindemith to the anchorite, Saint Anthony.
Beasts direct Antony every step of the way and animals now live in harmony with the anchorite, even providing him with his needs.
A second, longer text, The Revelations, was written later, after she became an anchorite attached to the church of Saint Julian.
To illustrate my point, I will draw on an extreme example of the negation of a "desire for community," namely, the iconic figure of the "asocial human being," variously called hermit, anchorite, or misanthrope, though important nuances should be observed between these terms.
How a monster is formed: And so there appeared in Bahia the somber anchorite with hair down to his shoulders, a long tangled beard, an emaciated face, and a piercing eye; a monstrous being clad in a blue canvas garment and leaning on the classic staff which is used to stay the pilgrim's tottering steps.
She is accompanied by two snakes, which are believed to have crept into her walled room (she was an anchorite) unbeknownst to anyone until her death (hence she is invoked as protector against snakebites).
It is Verda who situates Arcadia within the long tradition of utopian communities, as, "in her anchorite's rasp," she recounts for Bit and Hannah the story of her great-grandfather's communal experiment with the Divinists, who "believed that people could become perfect, therefore divine" (105).