androcentrism

(redirected from androcentric)
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androcentrism

the tendency to neglect the female perspective or the female contribution, i.e. male bias in cultural ideas and embodied in institutions.
References in periodicals archive ?
The curriculum was profoundly androcentric, ignoring women most of the time, glossing the experiences of (often elite and White) men as representative of all human life in the profoundly ambiguous notion of "Man." (p.
Aligning androcentric humanist ideology with the adolescent male gaze, Grossman's series renders visible the processes by which the uncritical acceptance of the discrete human body reduces, mutilates, compresses, and disavows the full range of possibilities for female (and human) subjectivity, embodiment, and agency.
Based on domination and control, androcentric patriarchy requires the exploitation of women, abuse of the environment, militarism, destructive technocracy, and rampant consumerism.
The works of Mary Daly and Letty Russell, Phyllis Trible and Rosemary Radford Ruether she described as foundation books that (1) "describe feminine imagery used for God in the Scriptures, (2) depatriarchalize the androcentric biblical traditions, and (3) enunciate a feminist hermeneutic for biblical interpretation." Then she reviewed Phyllis Trible's work on Genesis 2 and 3 in which Trible effectively discounted the idea that the biblical texts imply inferiority or subordination of the woman because she was created second and bears greater responsibility for sin.
Virginia Burrus elaborates, "in the process of glorifying the heretical woman, those of us who attempt to reconstruct the history of women in ancient Christianity have ironically embraced women's marginalization in so far as we have failed to break free from the inherently androcentric dichotomy of 'right-thinking male' and 'heretical female." (42) As demonstrated, this is not only an historical problem, but also one of sociology.
Together these artists will present the performance Sisyphos Has Been a Woman, which deals with our androcentric society and the role of women, which resembles the mythical Sisyphus, posing key questions.
Likewise, Linda Nochlin, Griselda Pollock, and Lisa Tickner, among others, have challenged the androcentric conceptualization of modernism.
Throughout the text, Christensen exposes root causes of Rastafarian culture's androcentric male-female relations.
However, given that the prevailing discourse of the world, for the most part, still stems from androcentric assumptions, the study of global issues from the perspective of gender continues to uncover feminist insights that are both valid and enlightening.
Chapter Two focuses on the rise of the female crime novel and the ways in which Denise Mina, Louise Welsh and Val McDermid have turned to popular fiction to craft a 'space of transgression' in which the androcentric nature of both genre and the modern Scottish polity might be theorised and thought through.
It is a sad commentary on what Susan Seymour, Du Bois's first biographer, calls the "androcentric" bias in anthropology that Du Bois is largely unknown to the public today, even to feminist scholars.
Feminist Critique of the Androcentric and Anthropocentric Tendencies in Christianity (1)