record

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record

1. a written account of some transaction that serves as legal evidence of the transaction
2. a written official report of the proceedings of a court of justice or legislative body, including the judgments given or enactments made
3. a list of crimes of which an accused person has previously been convicted, which are known to the police but may only be disclosed to a court in certain circumstances
4. have a record to be a known criminal; have a previous conviction or convictions
5. a thin disc of a plastic material upon which sound has been recorded. Each side has a spiral groove, which undulates in accordance with the frequency and amplitude of the sound. Records were formerly made from a shellac-based compound but were later made from vinyl plastics
6. Computing a group of data or piece of information preserved as a unit in machine-readable form
7. (in some computer languages) a data structure designed to allow the handling of groups of related pieces of information as though the group was a single entity
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Record

 

(Russian, protokol), in the USSR (1) an official document stating that an administrative violation has been committed; (2) a document giving an account of the course and results of procedural actions during the investigation of a criminal case; or (3) a document stating the proceedings of a court. The law defines the essential elements of a record and the requirements for compiling it.

An administrative record is compiled either by authorized officials (for example, militia officers or sanitary inspectors) or by representatives of the public (such as public controllers). It includes information about the offender, the nature, place, and time of the violation, and the witnesses. The record is signed by the person who drew it up, the person who committed the administrative violation, witnesses, and victims. The person against whom the record is directed has the right to add explanations and relevant comments in his own hand. The record is then sent to an administrative commission or other agency authorized to hear cases of administrative violations.

The record of an act of investigation is compiled by an investigator or person conducting an inquiry. Such a record states where, when, by whom, at what time of day, and with whose participation the investigative act was performed. It also indicates the type of act of investigation (interrogation, search, inspection, confrontation), what it revealed, and the content of the testimony (explanations) given by participants in the act of investigation. The record is read to all the participants in the act of investigation and is signed by them; remarks made at this time concerning its content are also entered in the record.

The record of a court session is kept by the secretary of the session and signed by the secretary as well as the person presiding at the session. The record states the place and date of the session, the time the session began and ended, the name and composition of the court, and the like. If a recording was used during the court session or if photographs or films were made, this information is entered in the record, and the recording, negatives and prints, or films are appended to the record. Participants in a court hearing have the right to add their remarks within three days after the record has been signed. Appellate and supervisory courts, which verify the legality and grounds of a judgment (decision), base their judgments concerning the proceedings of the court hearing on the record of the court session. Consequently, an incomplete or inaccurate record may result in a judicial error. The absence of a record entails the unconditional annulment of a court’s judgment or decision.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

What does it mean when you dream about a record? (cd, Lp, Cassette, Etc.)

A dream that includes some sort of recording can simply be a reflection of our everyday life, particularly if we often listen to music. Alternatively, it can symbolize the impressions other people leave on us or the impressions we would like to leave on them.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

record

[′rek·ərd]
(computer science)
A group of adjacent data items in a computer system, manipulated as a unit. Also known as entity.
(science and technology)
To preserve for later reproduction or reference.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

record

(data, database, programming)
An ordered set of fields, usually stored contiguously. The term is used with similar meaning in several different contexts. In a file, a "record" probably has some fixed length, in contrast to a "line" which may have any length and is terminated by some End Of Line sequence). A database record is also called a "row". In a spreadsheet it is always called a "row". Some programming languages use the term to mean a type composed of fields of several other types (C calls this a "struct").

In all these cases, a record represents an entity with certain field values.

Fields may be of a fixed width (bits or characters) or they may be separated by a delimiter character, often comma (CSV) or HT (TSV).

In a database the list of values of a given field from all records is called a column.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

record

(1) Pronounced "reck-erd," a group of related and adjacent fields of data about a subject or transaction. A collection of records makes up a database file or simple flat file. See flat file, relational database and master file.

(2) Pronounced "reck-erd," a block of data read and written at one time by the operating system's file system. The contents of a block may contain any type of data and are not a one-to-one relationship to database records as in definition #1 above. See file system.

(3) Pronounced "ruh-kord," to capture audio or video onto a magnetic tape, magnetic disk or solid state memory.

(4) Pronounced "reck-erd," an analog audio recording pressed into a vinyl disc, although early 78 RPM records were a mixture of shellac, cotton, slate and wax. These records are known as "phonograph records" or "gramophone records." See LP.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Results obtained from analysis of anecdotal records collected during stralegy instruction Comprehension Strategy Independent Use Enhanced Comprehension N N Connections 6 6 Prediction 4 4 Sequencing 3 3 Figure 7.
Figure 1 contains six logbook entries, or anecdotal records, concentrating one child.
As part of the research process, surveys, reflection logs, and anecdotal records were used to document the extent of the problem and the possible influence of the intervention.
To document students' progress in reading, the following methods of assessment were used: a behavioral checklist, anecdotal records, and surveys of parents and students.
Evidence for the existence of this problem included anecdotal records, teacher observations, student surveys, and assessments that indicated the level of student academic performance.
Evidence for the existence of the problem included clinical evaluation, anecdotal records, teacher observations, random testing/review of prior learned material and student self-assessments.
The problems of lack of reading strategies were documented through data revealing the number of students who performed below average or showed little growth on assessments, checklists, and anecdotal records. Analysis of probable cause data revealed that students reported frustration when reading from teacher assigned materials.
The problem was documented further through data collected from surveys, teacher-constructed tests, district-adopted tests, Illinois Standard Achievement Tests (ISAT), Burns and Roe's Informal Reading Inventories, and anecdotal records. Analysis of the probable cause data, as well as the professional literature revealed that several possible reasons existed for students' deficiency in the area of reading comprehension.
The problem of students exhibiting a lack of social skills and responsibility had been documented by student discipline referrals, anecdotal records, student surveys and checklists, and direct teacher observations checklists.
Evidence for the existence of the problem was presented in anecdotal records, teacher observations, and surveys.