anemochory


Also found in: Dictionary.

anemochory

[ə′nēm·ə‚kȯr·ē]
(ecology)
Wind dispersal of plant and animal disseminules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dispersal syndromes: Anemochory occurred in 32 (58.2 %) species overall, followed by autochory in 17 species (30.9 %), and zoochory in six species (10.9 %).
A remarkable case of anemochory in the genus Salvia is seen in S.
The pattern of dispersal syndromes is related to a greater frequency of dry fruit (dispersed on the ground by autochory or anemochory) in drier areas with marked seasonality, already detected in the Brazilian savannah (Cerrado) and reported by Batalha and Mantovani (2000), Figueiredo (2008) and Oliveira (1998).
Although this implies that several dispersal methods functioned together in the earliest succession stage, anemochory is obviously the most effective dispersal method (Figures 4(a) and 4(b)).
Hence, species with different structures form different dispersal syndromes, including anemochory [10-12], zoochory [13-23], autochory [24, 25], ombrohydrochory [7,25], and barochory [26].
Considering the species with determined syndromes (123), the zoochory predominated in all habits, corresponding to 69%, followed by autochory with 20% and anemochory with 11% (Figure 2).
Dispersal Syndrome: Barochory was the most common dispersal mode observed among the 23 species (48 % of species), followed by anemochory (39 %) and zoochory (13.08%).
For each species found in the plots, we searched the literature for information relating to: the functional groups (pioneer or non-pioneer) (sensu WHITMORE, 1989); and dispersal syndrome (zoochory, anemochory and autochory) (sensu Pijl, 1982).
The analysis of dispersal syndromes was out of the scope of this study; hence the fruits were classified only according to the presence of fleshy edible parts, instead of dispersal features (zoochory, autochory, and anemochory).