anemochory


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anemochory

[ə′nēm·ə‚kȯr·ē]
(ecology)
Wind dispersal of plant and animal disseminules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Anemochory comprised the largest number of climbing species in both vegetation types, paralleling the predominant dispersal mode for climbers in dry forests of other tropical areas (Gentry, 1982; Wikander, 1984; Mantovani & Martins, 1988; Solorzano, Ibarra-Manriquez, & Oyama, 2002).
Life Form: Herbaceous (H), Woody (W); Climbing Mechanism: Apical Twining (AT), Tendrilling (TE), Scandent (SC); Dispersal Syndrome: Anemochory (ANE), Autochory (AUT), Zoochory (ZOO).
A remarkable case of anemochory in the genus Salvia is seen in S.
There is evidence that a gradual change in the dispersal spectrum exists, from humid areas, where the predominant species have zoochorous syndromes, to drier ones, where syndromes of autochory or anemochory are more common.
The anemochory was relevant in vines, with 27% from the total; and in the other habits corresponded to 10% of herbs, 5% of trees and small trees and 5% of subshrubs (Figure 3).
In relation to seed density, anemochory was the most common dispersal mode (87%), followed by barochory (13 %) and zoochory (0.
In general, calyx morphology is well adapted to achene dispersal (Bouman & Meeuse, 1992) which, in the Mediterranean region, often occurs by diplochory (barochory and anemochory or myrmecochory).
In tropical forests, zoochory (Howe and Smallwood, 1982) prevails over abiotic syndromes while in less humid habitats, anemochory predominates (Vieira et al.
However, anemochory is not a basic mechanism of dispersal among seed plants (Bansal & Sen, 1981).