angelica

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angelica

(ănjĕl`ĭkə), any species of the genus Angelica, plants of the family Umbelliferae (parsleyparsley,
Mediterranean aromatic herb (Petroselinum crispum or Apium petroselinum) of the carrot family, cultivated since the days of the Romans for its foliage, used in cookery as a seasoning and garnish.
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 family), native to the Northern Hemisphere and New Zealand, valued for their potency as a medicament and protection against evil spirits and the plague, which probably accounts for the name; angelica is a poetic symbol for inspiration. The roots and fruits yield angelica oil, which is used in perfume, confectionery, medicine, and for flavoring liqueurs (such as angelica). The species most often used for these purposes is A. archangelica, a subarctic and alpine plant of the Old World once extensively grown but now seldom cultivated outside Germany. This and a few other species are sometimes used as ornamentals. Angelica is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Apiales, family Umbelliferae.

Angelica

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

One of many plants and herbs used by Witch herbalists. Medicinally, it is a stimulant, a tonic, and an aromatic or diaphoretic. It is used for the kidneys, spleen and heart, and to induce perspiration. Its Latin name is angelica atropurpurea. As a diaphoretic, or agent to increase perspiration, it is best administered hot before the recipient goes to bed.

Magically, angelica is used for healing and is often used in conjunction with vervain (verbena officinalis), feverfew (pyrethum parthenium), and betony (betonica officinalis). Angelica leaves hung about the neck are said to protect the wearer from evil spells and conjurations. It featured in early Nordic magic, and was used as a charm to be worn as a protection against the plague, in the fifteenth century.

Angelica

 

a genus of perennial or biennial plants of the Umbelliferae family.

Angelicas are large herbs with fistular stems and bipinnate or tripinnate leaves. The petals are mostly white. The fruits are flattened at the back and have alar border ribs. There are about 50 (according to other data, up to 80) species in the northern hemisphere and New Zealand. There are 17 species in the USSR, primarily in the Far East. The most common is the wild angelica (A. sylvestris), which grows in forests, glades, and thickets. The young plants are eaten by cattle. The plants are suitable for silage. The fruits contain coumarins.

angelica

[an′jel·ə·kə]
(food engineering)
A spice from the perennial herb Angelica archangelica of the ginger family.
An amber or a yellow sweet wine without muscat flavor.

Angelica

infidel princess of exquisite grace and charm. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Innamorato; Orlando Furioso]

Angelica

betrays Orlando by eloping with young soldier. [Ital. Lit.: Orlando Furioso]

angelica

traditional representation of inspiration. [Herb Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 164]

angelica

any tall umbelliferous plant of the genus Angelica, having compound leaves and clusters of small white or greenish flowers, esp A. archangelica, the aromatic seeds, leaves, and stems of which are used in medicine and cookery
References in periodicals archive ?
What these verses share with Angelica's graffiti is an antithetical relationship to the Petrarchan model, whose barely concealed echo in Medoro's poem makes explicit Ariosto's polemic intent.
In fact, Medoro's verse is not without an element of sexual boasting and could be read, cynically, as a testament to male dominance behavior at its most self-satisfied.(20) When he announces his conquest of the highborn Angelica, "da molti invano amata," Medoro is not only thumbing his nose at his lady's failed suitors--Orlando above all--he is also one-upping Petrarch, rewriting the lyric of wish-fulfillment fantasy according to the canons of the epithalamion.
When Orlando enters this landscape he is literally walking into a text.(22) The liber naturae has become a liber amoris, one which writes him out of the love story that he had hoped to enact with Angelica.(23) As reader of the inscriptions, Orlando probably conjured up the same spectacle of intertwined bodies that the painters did who projected Angelica's loveknots back onto the limbs of the amorous couple.
Infelice quell'antro, et ogni stelo in cui Medoro e Angelica si legge!
(Alas for the cave, and for every trunk on which the names of Medor and Angelica were written!
I said earlier that Angelica's graffitomania was necessary to establish the referential pole of poetic discourse--her writing refers back to a lovemaking which happened, whereas Petrarchan lyric refers to an absence, a lack, and hence falls back on itself as its own privileged object.
Ariosto offers the strongest argument for the textuality of this love in his description of Angelica's deflowering.
Behind Angelica's writing and Orlando's reading lie a set of literary strategies which clash on one level only to reconcile themselves on another.
(Lee is referring to Canto 19 here, but it could be argued that Angelica's final impact on the action of the poem takes place through her written traces in Canto 23.) I owe a considerable debt to Lee's magisterial study, which will be cited liberally in these pages.
(20)Medoro's boast supports Eugenio Donato's subtle observation that Angelica functions merely to generate rivalry among the various knights who desire her, for such rivalry, and the distinctions it leads to in combat, serve to create "arbitrary differences where there is nothing but identity." See "Per selve e boscherecci labirinti," p.
(22)Thus, Eugenio Donato argues that Orlando has "involuntarily entered into literature, and more specifically into the very narrative of the Orlando Furioso" because Angelica's inscriptions tell a story already narrated by the poem, thus making Orlando a reader of Ariosto's own text.