Anger


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Related to Anger: Anger problems

Anger

Allecto
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Almeira
scorned woman like whom “hell hath no fury.” [Br. Drama: The Mourning Bride]
Belinda
furious over loss of lock of hair. [Br. Lit.: Rape of the Lock]
Bernardo
enraged that member of a rival street-gang is making advances to his sister. [Am. Musical: West Side Story]
Brunhild
furiously vengeful concerning Kriemhild’s accusations of promiscuity. [Ger. Lit.: Nibelungenlied]
Erinyes
(the Furies) angry and avenging deities who pursue evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 347]
Fudd, Elmer
hapless man seethes over Bugs Bunny’s antics. [Comics: “Bugs Bunny” in Horn, 140]
Hera
(Rom. Juno) angry at Zeus’s illicit sexual pleasure. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 563]
Herod
angry at wise men’s disobedience, orders slaughter of male infants. [N.T.: Matthew 2:16–17]
Hulk, the
character whose anger transforms him into monster. [Comics: Horn, 324–325]
Megaera
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Nemesis
goddess of vengeance. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 173]
Oronte
takes offense at Alceste’s criticism of sonnet. [Fr. Lit.: The Misanthrope]
Othello
smothers wife, Desdemona, in paroxysm of rage over her suspected adultery. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Rumpelstiltskin
stamps ground in rage over lass’s discovery of his name. [Ger. Fairy Tale: Rumpelstiltskin]
Tisiphone
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Volumnia
“in anger, Junolike.” [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]
whin
indicates fury. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]

Anger

(dreams)
This may be a carry-over from your daily life. In our dreams we can experience and express such feelings safely. Feeling great anger in your dream may be disturbing but pay attention to it and attempt to deal with all of your emotions in a more appropriate and productive manner. On a side note, many Jungian analysts believe that the emotions that we experience in dreams are not reliable, may have the opposite meaning, and in general should not be the only thing considered when interpreting a dream.
References in classic literature ?
To contain anger from mischief, though it take hold of a man, there be two things, whereof you must have special caution.
For raising and appeasing anger in another; it is done chiefly by choosing of times, when men are frowardest and worst disposed, to incense them.
The son of Peleus was furious, and his heart within his shaggy breast was divided whether to draw his sword, push the others aside, and kill the son of Atreus, or to restrain himself and check his anger.
And Minerva said, "I come from heaven, if you will hear me, to bid you stay your anger.
Son of Atreus, check your anger, I implore you; end this quarrel with Achilles, who in the day of battle is a tower of strength to the Achaeans.
Therefore, Patroclus, bring her and give her to them, but let them be witnesses by the blessed gods, by mortal men, and by the fierceness of Agamemnon's anger, that if ever again there be need of me to save the people from ruin, they shall seek and they shall not find.
So he went back in anger, and Apollo, who loved him dearly, heard his prayer.
Would indeed that you had lived your span free from all sorrow at your ships, for it is all too brief; alas, that you should be at once short of life and long of sorrow above your peers: woe, therefore, was the hour in which I bore you; nevertheless I will go to the snowy heights of Olympus, and tell this tale to Jove, if he will hear our prayer: meanwhile stay where you are with your ships, nurse your anger against the Achaeans, and hold aloof from fight.
She had cherished her anger till it grew strong and took possession of her, as evil thoughts and feelings always do unless cast out at once.
No sooner had Lydgate begun to represent this step to himself as the easiest than there was a reaction of anger that he--he who had long ago determined to live aloof from such abject calculations, such self-interested anxiety about the inclinations and the pockets of men with whom he had been proud to have no aims in common--should have fallen not simply to their level, but to the level of soliciting them.
The old Squire was an implacable man: he made resolutions in violent anger, and he was not to be moved from them after his anger had subsided-- as fiery volcanic matters cool and harden into rock.
He had been in a rage with Dunstan, and had thought of nothing but a thorough break-up of their mutual understanding; but what it would be really wisest for him to do, was to try and soften his father's anger against Dunsey, and keep things as nearly as possible in their old condition.