Anger


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Related to Anger: Anger problems

Anger

Allecto
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Almeira
scorned woman like whom “hell hath no fury.” [Br. Drama: The Mourning Bride]
Belinda
furious over loss of lock of hair. [Br. Lit.: Rape of the Lock]
Bernardo
enraged that member of a rival street-gang is making advances to his sister. [Am. Musical: West Side Story]
Brunhild
furiously vengeful concerning Kriemhild’s accusations of promiscuity. [Ger. Lit.: Nibelungenlied]
Erinyes
(the Furies) angry and avenging deities who pursue evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 347]
Fudd, Elmer
hapless man seethes over Bugs Bunny’s antics. [Comics: “Bugs Bunny” in Horn, 140]
Hera
(Rom. Juno) angry at Zeus’s illicit sexual pleasure. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 563]
Herod
angry at wise men’s disobedience, orders slaughter of male infants. [N.T.: Matthew 2:16–17]
Hulk, the
character whose anger transforms him into monster. [Comics: Horn, 324–325]
Megaera
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Nemesis
goddess of vengeance. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 173]
Oronte
takes offense at Alceste’s criticism of sonnet. [Fr. Lit.: The Misanthrope]
Othello
smothers wife, Desdemona, in paroxysm of rage over her suspected adultery. [Br. Lit.: Othello]
Rumpelstiltskin
stamps ground in rage over lass’s discovery of his name. [Ger. Fairy Tale: Rumpelstiltskin]
Tisiphone
one of the three Furies, vengeful deities who punish evil-doers. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 274]
Volumnia
“in anger, Junolike.” [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]
whin
indicates fury. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 178]

Anger

(dreams)
This may be a carry-over from your daily life. In our dreams we can experience and express such feelings safely. Feeling great anger in your dream may be disturbing but pay attention to it and attempt to deal with all of your emotions in a more appropriate and productive manner. On a side note, many Jungian analysts believe that the emotions that we experience in dreams are not reliable, may have the opposite meaning, and in general should not be the only thing considered when interpreting a dream.
References in classic literature ?
The revelation about the money must be made the very next morning; and if he withheld the rest, Dunstan would be sure to come back shortly, and, finding that he must bear the brunt of his father's anger, would tell the whole story out of spite, even though he had nothing to gain by it.
This horrible sight turned me faint, but, to my surprise, my uncle did not show so much surprise as anger.
Observe, too, how the emperor turns away, and leaves Don Gaiferos fuming; and you see now how in a burst of anger, he flings the table and the board far from him and calls in haste for his armour, and asks his cousin Don Roland for the loan of his sword, Durindana, and how Don Roland refuses to lend it, offering him his company in the difficult enterprise he is undertaking; but he, in his valour and anger, will not accept it, and says that he alone will suffice to rescue his wife, even though she were imprisoned deep in the centre of the earth, and with this he retires to arm himself and set out on his journey at once.
As for Captain Speedy, he was shut up in his cabin under lock and key, and was uttering loud cries, which signified an anger at once pardonable and excessive.
Under Thought is included every effect which has to be produced by speech, the subdivisions being,-- proof and refutation; the excitation of the feelings, such as pity, fear, anger, and the like; the suggestion of importance or its opposite.
And I have seen him put the pent-up anger of his heart into the aspect of the inaccessible sun, and cause it to glare fiercely like the eye of an implacable autocrat out of a pale and frightened sky.
Thy poor feyther 'ull ne'er anger thee no more; an' thy mother may's well go arter him--the sooner the better--for I'm no good to nobody now.
Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus, that brought countless ills upon the Achaeans.
And this monosyllable indicated as much anger as the young man might have expected gratitude.
In the deep gloom she could not see the anger which suffused his face.
TO SEEK to extinguish anger utterly, is but a bravery of the Stoics.
Then the enchantress allowed her anger to be softened, and said to him: 'If the case be as you say, I will allow you to take away with you as much rampion as you will, only I make one condition, you must give me the child which your wife will bring into the world; it shall be well treated, and I will care for it like a mother.