Inhibitor

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Related to angiogenesis inhibitor: tumor angiogenesis

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moulton will extend our research efforts by exploring the role of angiogenesis inhibitors in cardiovascular disease.
We found that approximately three-quarters of Brazilian and Mexican oncologists point to reimbursement and/or budget-related restrictions as limiting the use of angiogenesis inhibitors," said Decision Resources Analyst Andreia Ribeiro, Ph.
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Several new agents in development seek to achieve this goal, including immune system modulators (such as MAbs and immunotoxins), cell-cycle inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, apoptosis inducers, and angiogenesis inhibitors.
The ability of HDAC inhibitors to synergize with classic chemotherapeutic agents as well as newer signal transduction pathway modulators and angiogenesis inhibitors represents an increasingly appreciated concept meaning that in contrast to the current wave of targeted therapies, the utility of HDAC inhibitors could span multiple cancers and be used alongside a broad range of therapeutics.
Approval of these drugs essentially validated the concept of angiogenesis, and interest in developing angiogenesis inhibitors has increased.