angle of arrival


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angle of arrival

[′aŋ·gəl əv ə′rīv·əl]
(electromagnetism)
A measure of the direction of propagation of electromagnetic radiation upon arrival at a receiver (the term is most commonly used in radio); it is the angle between the plane of the phase front and some plane of reference, usually the horizontal, at the receiving antenna.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 7: The array antenna pattern of antijamming for different method: the angle of arrival of the satellite signal is 0 degrees and the angles of arrival of jamming signals are -6 degrees, 12 degrees, and 40 degrees.
Janaswamy "Angle of arrival statistics for a 3-D Spheroid Model," IEEE Trnas, veh.
To estimate the angle of arrival of the tag's signal, we use a phased antenna array composed of two individual antenna elements.
Sound delay and sound waves angle of arrival are estimated by using three microphones.
Angle of arrival of signals can clearly interpret physical behavior of the channels.
Input azimuth angle of arrival for desired signal =40[degrees] Input elevation angle of arrival for desired signal =20[degrees]
The angle of arrival referenced to the centre point of one sensor pair can be calculated using the inverse cosine function (Arcus-Cosine) (Fig.
The range estimation measurements can be based on different physical variables: received signal strength (RSS), time of arrival (TOA) or angle of arrival (AOA).
Since the perpendicular to the baseline is considered the "zero" angle of an interferometer, angle B is the measured angle of arrival. The angle of arrival at the site also includes the orientation of the baseline.
Delay-line frequency discriminators have long been fundamental components in radar warning receivers, instantaneous frequency measurement receivers (IFM) and angle of arrival interferometers.
By using a hybrid Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA), Angle of Arrival (AOA) technology, and a 30 db improvement in base station location sensitivity, SigmaOne will be able to deliver a system accuracy that exceeds the FCC mandate of 410 feet accuracy (95 percent and beyond), and will allow CDMA carriers to offer a range of location-based services to their customers.