artery

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artery

artery, blood vessel that conveys blood away from the heart. Except for the pulmonary artery, which carries deoxygenated blood from the heart to the lungs, arteries carry oxygenated blood from the heart to the tissues. The largest arterial trunk is the aorta, branches of which divide and subdivide into ever-smaller tubes, or arterioles, until they terminate as minute capillaries, the latter connecting with the veins (see circulatory system). Other important arteries are the subclavian and brachial arteries of the shoulder and arm, the carotid arteries that lead to the head, the coronary arteries that nourish the heart itself, and the iliac and femoral arteries of the abdomen and lower extremities. The walls of the large arteries have three layers: a tough elastic outer coat, a layer of muscular tissue, and a smooth, thin inner coat. Arterial walls expand and contract with each heartbeat, pumping blood throughout the body. The pulsating movement of blood, or pulse, may be felt where the large arteries lie near the body surface.
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artery

[′ärd·ə·rē]
(anatomy)
A vascular tube that carries blood away from the heart.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

artery

any of the tubular thick-walled muscular vessels that convey oxygenated blood from the heart to various parts of the body
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The results showed that: there was no statistically significant difference in the distance from LSC (top, bottom) to the skin and medial canthus between the different sexes; there was no statistically significant difference in the distance from the angular artery to the skin and medial canthus between the different sexs (Tables II and III).
The results of this study showed that the approximate shape of lacrimal sac was the oval cystic structure, with its vertical diameter as the longest diameter, while the anteroposterior diameter was the shortest, and rich blood flow signals could be seen above the nose (angular artery).
Van Thienen mentions the angular artery, while Fontaine et al.