angular diameter


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angular diameter

See apparent diameter.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

angular diameter

[′an·gyə·lər ‚dī′am·əd·ər]
(astronomy)
The angle subtended at the observer by a diameter of a distant spherical body which is perpendicular to the line between the observer and the center of the body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Its shape resembles the diffraction corona, consisting of a white central area with angular diameter of a few degrees surrounded by a reddish ring, but now the center is at the shadow point (Fig.
The angular diameter (top, in arcminutes) and distance from the Earth (below, in thousands of kilometres) of the Full Moon during 2015.
The maximum angular diameter, given in arcseconds, is based on its equatorial diameter at minimum geocentric distance.
Tango of the University of Sydney, report that they have determined the angular diameter of the star Sirius by a new interferometry, that has not previously been used for stars of ordinary size.
The giant planet dims from magnitude -2.5 to -2.3 during June, and its angular diameter decreases from 44" to 41V2".
100-170 AD) determined the apparent angular diameter of the Moon to be equal to or larger than that of the Sun, which he considered to be constant.
When at minimum geocentric distance, its maximum angular diameter is 59.25 arcseconds on March 28.
Vesta sports an angular diameter of 0.69" for most of June, but seeing and transparency will affect the view, especially when the target is close to the horizon.
It is well known that later Galileo developed a different technique for angular measurements, reaching a remarkable precision, and that he used the angular diameter of Jupiter as a reference scale, as he says in the Discourse on Bodies Floating in Water, published in 1612.
Venus still shines at-3.9 this month and grows only a little in angular diameter --from about 11W to 13", while shrinking only a little in phase--from 89% to 80% illuminated.
A chapter on imaging, using webcams and digital single-lens reflex cameras, introduces a number of active asteroid observers, and highlights a remarkable resolved image of Ceres (angular diameter 0.83 arcsec) by John Sussenbach.

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