anhedonia


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Related to anhedonia: Ejaculatory Anhedonia

anhedonia

[‚an·hə′dōn·ē·ə]
(psychology)
Inability to experience pleasure from activities that ordinarily produce pleasurable feelings.
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The baseline data suggest that passively collected "dry biomarkers" (digital assessments used to monitor for a treatment effect) correlate with specific symptom domains, including anhedonia.
Anhedonia in schizophrenia: distinctions between anticipatory and consummatory pleasure.
Highly distressed symptoms included feeling depressed / hopeless, feeling guilty, poor concentration, anhedonia, initial insomnia, middle / terminal insomnia, and fatigue.
Entre las dimensiones del CDI, la anhedonia fue la que demostro correlaciones mas altas con la calidad de vida, relacion que fue confirmada en las regresiones lineales (tabla 4).
They found four of them, which they termed anhedonia, worry, tension, and anxious arousal, a dimension encompassing physical symptoms, including shortness of breath and heart palpitations.
Sometimes anhedonia can be quite general, encompassing, as Solomon makes clear, even such basic desires as the desire to eat something for lunch.
Table 3 shows that all the patients had depressed mood while more than 80% had anhedonia, anorexia and insomnia.
Changes in mesolimbic dopamine may explain stress-induced anhedonia.
LNG-IUS users reported significantly less anhedonia than nonusers in the previous year (19% vs 22%; Pc.
If infants are not sufficiently exposed to such reliable patterns, their pleasure systems do not mature properly, provoking anhedonia.
Categories are: Depressivity, referring to low mood, difficulty in finding meaning in life, negative self-image, and overstating difficulties; Submission/Self-Negation, containing items about an individual's need for satisfying others and putting them first; Anhedonia, containing items concerning an individual's difficulty in feeling pleasure; 'Self-Devaluation', consisting of sentences where the individual devalues personal gain; Self-Deprecation, including psychological suffering due to one's own actions; and Culpability, containing items regarding feeling guilty due to personal actions perceived as failures or mistakes.
Conversely, the patients with current major depression were more likely to present with psychomotor agitation/retardation, loss of interest, anhedonia, feelings of worthlessness-guilt, insomnia, and suicidal thoughts compared to the patients with pure dysthymia.