anhydrobiosis


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anhydrobiosis

[¦an‚hī·drō ‚bī′ō·səs]
(physiology)
A type of cryptobiosis induced by dehydration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The induction of anhydrobiosis in the sleeping chironomid: current status of our knowledge.
Physiological, genetic and molecular mechanisms of chemoreception, thermobiosis and anhydrobiosis in entomopathogenic nematodes.
Anhydrobiosis in the free-living antarctic nematode Panagrolaimus davidi (Nematoda: Rhabditida).
Focusing on rotifers in particular, nearly all species in one of the two major rotifer classes (Bdelloidea) are capable of anhydrobiosis; this can occur in either the egg or the adult stage (Ricci, 2001).
The ability of plant-parasitic nematodes to survive for lengthy periods in the absence of host plants has been recorded previously (e.g., Harrison and Hooper 1963, McKendry 1987), and may be due to survival strategies based on anhydrobiosis, at least in dry conditions (Demeure and Freckman 1981), or because these nematodes could have survived on other resources present in the soil, such as nonliving plant material (see Eriksson 1974, Verdejo-Lucas and Pinochet 1992) or soluble soil C (see Nicholas 1962).
This paradox may be explained in that nematodes can survive extreme desiccation and freezing by entering into anhydrobiosis and cryobiosis (Pickup and Rothery 1991, Wharton and Block 1993) and may live in microsites in the soil where moisture and water-vapor movement is sufficient for activity, but difficult to measure (Freckman and Virginia 1989).
Crowe and his colleagues have been inspired by a zoo of organisms whose ability to enter a dry state of suspended animation and then to be revived by water is called anhydrobiosis. When moistened, many of these creatures rapidly swell and resume their full metabolic activities, often within minutes.