aniline dye


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aniline dye

[′an·əl·ən ′dī]
(organic chemistry)
A dye derived from aniline.
References in periodicals archive ?
For comparison the values of the rate coefficient were determined for a real BTW of aniline dye production.
Apply a dark brown aniline dye stain (Photo 3), and when that's dry, an oil finish.
During the era of active aniline dye discovery, many of the new textile stains were also tested on pathologic specimens.
Coomaraswamy's call for swadeshi in colour via a critique of aniline dyes in the opening decade of the 20th century was, in fact, an inquest upon the industrial uses of scientific research.
The pieces "reflect an outward journey and inward exploration," expressed with synchromatic, transparent aniline dyes with acrylic highlights, he said.
As early as the 1830s, husks of corn were used as decorative overlay, and worsted wool yarn was probably introduced in the 1880s, along with aniline dyes to expand the available range of colors.
In the 19th-century United States, the tanning industry combined sumac with hemlock to treat leather, while weavers mixed it with gall nuts as a mordant to fix colors in aniline dyes.
Traditionally, the crop was grown for its seeds, and used for colouring and flavouring foods, in medicines, and making red (carthamin) and yellow dyes, especially before cheaper aniline dyes became available.
Subjects presented here include microbiology's Ferdinand Cohn and concepts of the discreteness of nature, German-Jewish chemists and Raphael Meldola in the search for aniline dyes, Felix Hansdorff's career in cultural and mathematical modernism, Leon Michaelis and Emil Abderhalden and the workings habits of Jewish and non-Jewish chemists in Germany, Zionist men of science between nature and nurture, Einstein and reform Judaism as it relates to the Fries school, value-based genetic studies of ethnic communities in Israel, German and Israeli attitudes about reproductive genetics, pragmatic and dogmatic physics in 1938, and Jewish emigrants and German Scientists after World War II.
While the German chemists, under Domagk, tried for years to attach sulfur to various aniline dyes, a team of French scientists showed that it was the sulfur, and not the dyes, that had the antibacterial effect.
By the mid-1800s, the development of coal-derived aniline dyes had dramatically reduced the demand for logwood.
Aniline dyes, readily available in regional markets, usually are the source for bright colors, but natural dyestuffs are used and even enjoying a comeback, especially among purists intent on producing textiles that have the look and feel of bygone days.