aniline dye


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aniline dye

[′an·əl·ən ′dī]
(organic chemistry)
A dye derived from aniline.
References in periodicals archive ?
The values of the rate coefficient [[zeta].sub.COD] for our BTW of aniline dye production are much lower, because after biological oxidation the solution contains mainly final oxidation products, aldehydes, ketones, and carbocyclic acids.
This, however, may not have been necessary, as what is Known now which wasn't Known then, is that aniline dyes, in their raw form, are carcinogenic.
During the era of active aniline dye discovery, many of the new textile stains were also tested on pathologic specimens.[24] Congo red was no exception.
Apply a dark brown aniline dye stain (Photo 3), and when that's dry, an oil finish.
The problem of colour was not simply hinged on the opposition between natural dyes and aniline dyes. The issue was confounded by the threat of alienating artisans from their hereditary occupations on the one hand, and swadeshi petitions for the promotion of an Indian science and industry, on the other.
--It goes behind the scenes of key inventions such as the sewing machine, aniline dyes and paper patterns and how these revolutionised the fashion industry, leading to mass production and to the high street department stores we have today.
Prior to joining Orion Engineered Carbons, Henneke served as director of Americas--Architectural and Industrial Colorants Division of Chromaflo Technologies and global business manager, Inks and Coatings Division of Keystone Aniline Dyes.
Prior to joining Orion Engineered Carbons, Henneke served as director of Americas--Architectural and Industrial Colorants Division of Chromaflo Technologies and global business manager, Inks and Coatings Division of Keystone Aniline Dyes. He is president of the Chicago Printing Ink & Production Club (CPIPC) and a member of NPE and the Chicago Paint & Coatings Society.
The pieces "reflect an outward journey and inward exploration," expressed with synchromatic, transparent aniline dyes with acrylic highlights, he said.
As early as the 1830s, husks of corn were used as decorative overlay, and worsted wool yarn was probably introduced in the 1880s, along with aniline dyes to expand the available range of colors.
In the 19th-century United States, the tanning industry combined sumac with hemlock to treat leather, while weavers mixed it with gall nuts as a mordant to fix colors in aniline dyes. Writing in The American Botanist in 1909, Frank Dobbin recalled, "Our grandmothers too had a use for the sumach.
Traditionally, the crop was grown for its seeds, and used for colouring and flavouring foods, in medicines, and making red (carthamin) and yellow dyes, especially before cheaper aniline dyes became available.