aniline printing

aniline printing

[′an·əl·ən ‚print·iŋ]
(graphic arts)
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"From its inception, aniline printing - or flexography, as we know it - has continuously evolved to fit the decorative and converting needs of our industry, all inline," says Nagle.
The water-based printing process was invented in England around 1890 and was then called aniline printing. In 1952, Frank Moss and a group of other printers renamed the process to flexography.
(Flexography was first called aniline printing, because early flexographic inks contained dyes derived from aniline oil, a liquid extracted from the indigo plant.) But through trials, tribulations, and perseverance, and when the FDA approved the process, the printing method caught on.