animal locomotion


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animal locomotion

[′an·ə·məl ‚lō·kə′mō·shən]
(zoology)
Progressive movement of an animal body from one point to another.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"We would like to explore how animal locomotion behaviours may have responded to environmental changes and to understand the function of animal motility -- for example, looking for food, oxygen, or mates; or escaping from predators," Xiao said.
Dubbed as the fusion of yoga, martial arts, and animal locomotion, the Budokon yoga is considered to help one attain a toned body, according to the South China Morning Post.
The plenary presentations for CLAWAR 2015 discuss infrastructure robotics: opportunities and challenges, cognition-inspired robot learning and control, biologically inspired miniature jumping robots from design to control, and understanding animal locomotion using biologically inspired robotics and soft robotics.
He later relocated to the University of Pennsylvania to undertake an extensive project dedicated to capturing on film an array of human and animal motions taken from "every-day life." (19) This project, published in its entirety in 1887 under the title Animal Locomotion, lays much of the groundwork for the cinematic technologies and cinematic subjects of the next two decades, experimenting with diverse camera distances, speeds, timings, and angles.
We have applied it to predict all the main features of the design of animal locomotion, which includes human running and swimming.
This paper argues that Aristotle operates with a particular theoretical model in his explanation of animal locomotion, what the paper calls the "centralized incoming and outgoing motions" (CIOM) model.
Rieck's oil-on-canvas moonlit nocturne from 1856, and Eadweard Muybridge's Animal Locomotion collotypes (Descending stairs, turning, cup and saucer in right hand, 1887).
Since animal locomotion is basically a falling-forward process, Bejan contends that added height predicts an increase in speed.