resin

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Related to anion exchange resin: Cation exchange resin

resin

resin, any of a class of amorphous solids or semisolids. Resins are found in nature and are chiefly of vegetable origin. They are typically light yellow to dark brown in color; tasteless; odorless or faintly aromatic; translucent or transparent; brittle, fracturing like glass; and flammable, burning with a smoky flame. Resins are soluble in alcohol, ether, and many hydrocarbons but are insoluble in water. When heated, they soften and finally melt. Their chemical composition varies, but most are mixtures of organic acids and esters. Resins are generally classified according to their source or by such qualities as hardness or solubility. Natural resins are found as exudations, often as globules or tears, on the bark of various trees (mostly pines and firs) or on other living plants; they also occur as fossils or as exudations from the bodies of certain scale insects (see lac). Some natural resins, called oleoresins, contain both a resin and an essential oil; they are often viscid, sticky, gummy, or plastic. Other resins are exceedingly hard and resistant to most solvents, softening only at high temperatures. The primary uses for most resins are in varnish, shellac, and lacquer, in medicine, in molded articles (e.g., pipe mouthpieces), and in electrical insulators. See amber; balsam; benzoin; Canada balsam; copaiba; dragon's blood; mastic; rosin; turpentine.
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resin

[′rez·ən]
(organic chemistry)
Any of a class of solid or semisolid organic products of natural or synthetic origin with no definite melting point, generally of high molecular weight; most resins are polymers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

resin

A nonvolatile solid or semisolid organic material, usually of high molecular weight; obtained as gum from certain trees or manufactured synthetically; tends to flow when subjected to heat or stress; soluble in most organic solvents but not in water; the film-forming component of a paint or varnish; used in making plastics and adhesives.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

resin

1. any of a group of solid or semisolid amorphous compounds that are obtained directly from certain plants as exudations. They are used in medicine and in varnishes
2. any of a large number of synthetic, usually organic, materials that have a polymeric structure, esp such a substance in a raw state before it is moulded or treated with plasticizer, stabilizer, filler, etc
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The lowest amount of PO4 - P was recorded in anion exchange resin, which is analogous to plant root.
This can explain, in part, the greater amount of clay and iron oxide in the soil of this study (Table 1) which was at least five times greater than the amounts reported by Schmitt (2012), and can reduce the amount of P extracted with anion exchange resin, since there is a strong energy between the oxygen of the phosphate and the cation of the Fe-OH groups of the surface oxides (Barrow et al., 1998).
It was shown that the surface complexation did its work for the adsorption of Ni(II) by D301R anion exchange resin.
Two x 5-[cm.sup.2] anion exchange resin strips (BDH) were placed into the remaining 40 mL of 0.45-[micro]m filtered supernatant solution and shaken end-over-end for 2 h.
"Using Anion Exchange Resins to Remove THM Precursors." By Philip H.-S.