annihilation


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annihilation

A reaction between an elementary particle and its antiparticle in which the two particles disappear and photons or other particles and antiparticles are created; energy and momentum are conserved. An electron and a positron, for example, interact and produce two gamma-ray photons. Hadrons, such as the proton and the antiproton, also undergo annihilation, as do quarks and antiquarks.

annihilation

[ə‚nī·ə′lā·shən]
(particle physics)
A process in which an antiparticle and a particle combine and release their rest energies in other particles.
References in periodicals archive ?
The three countries also agreed to continue cooperation till final annihilation of the terrorist groups in Syria, it added.
The partner of one prisoner told the Record: "It's the Annihilation that is causing the problems.
Another five people collapsed after taking Annihilation in Rochdale, Greater Manchester yesterday.
Troubling statistics about the number of animal species lost every year have become sadly commonplace, and The Annihilation of Nature blends words and pictures in a moving account of this sixth mass extinction.
For more updates about "Planetary Annihilation," as well as other news about gaming, technology, entertainment, business, science, finance, health, economy, sports and space, keep reading (http://au.
Annihilation owes less to the genre tradition than much of the author's earlier work, though no fan of vanderMeer's Ambergris world building in Finch or Shriek: An Afterword (2006), for instance, will be disappointed by his latest effort.
It comes after two teenagers ended up in hospital after taking Annihilation, which is sold as potpourri.
It comes after police in Scotland last week warned against Annihilation use, saying it had left at least nine people in hospital over the last three months.
Geoffrey Megargee, a research scholar at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies and an award-winning military historian, draws upon the latest scholarship on Wehrmacht crimes and the newest literature on Operation Barbarossa to present a synthetic overview of a campaign conceived from the start as a war of annihilation between peoples rather than militaries.
Bitton-Jackson's story is a heartwarming account of picking up the pieces of one's life after surviving almost total annihilation.
Chapters examine the annihilation of books and libraries as tactic of political or ethnic protest, and move on to explore the execution and aftermath of libricidal, homicidal, and genocidal conflicts in Germany, Afghanistan, Cambodia, Sri Lanka, India, and more.