annular eclipse


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annular eclipse

an eclipse of the sun in which the moon does not cover the entire disc of the sun, so that a ring of sunlight surrounds the shadow of the moon

annular eclipse

See eclipse.

annular eclipse

[′an·yə·lər i′klips]
(astronomy)
An eclipse in which a thin ring of the source of light appears around the obscuring body.
References in periodicals archive ?
We had two solar eclipses: An annular eclipse on May 20 and a total eclipse on November 13.
The annular eclipse on May 20th will offer observers a rare and spectacular view as the Moon passes directly between the Sun and Earth.
During an annular eclipse, the moon blocks most of the sun.
According to the BBC, the annular eclipse exceeded 11 minutes when viewed from the countries near the Indian Ocean -- a record for the millennium.
According to astronomical websites, the last annular eclipse occurred roughly 1 year ago, January 26, 2009.
The spectacle, visible in a roughly 300-kilometre (185-mile) band running 12,900 kilometers (8,062 miles) across the globe, set a record for the longest annular eclipse that will remain unbeaten for more than a thousand years.
1 The Taj Mahal; 2 Ginger; 3 Friends; 4 1971; 5 Seven; 6 Chelsea; 7 Fats Waller; 8 Australia; 9 John Keats; 10 Annular eclipse.
ANSWERS: 1 The Taj Mahal; 2 Ginger; 3 Friends; 4 1971; 5 Seven; 6 Chelsea; 7 Fats Waller; 8 Australia; 9 John Keats; 10 Annular eclipse.
He would further have been able to observe visually that the cause of the eclipse was at least an opaque circular body, as it stood silhouetted by the sun during the annular eclipse. This observation was consistent with the hypothesis of a spherical solid body, the moon, being the cause.
It will still be slightly smaller than the Sun, producing an annular eclipse that leaves a ring of light in the sky, rather than a total eclipse.
I was disappointed to see no pictures of the annular eclipse from our region in the Gazette on Saturday night (though there were excellent pictures from Scotland and Athens).
An annular eclipse was visible in Iceland and Greenland on Saturday morning (31 May), while a partial eclipse was seen in other countries including Norway and Scotland.