annular eclipse

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Related to annular eclipses: Total solar eclipse

annular eclipse

an eclipse of the sun in which the moon does not cover the entire disc of the sun, so that a ring of sunlight surrounds the shadow of the moon

annular eclipse

See eclipse.

annular eclipse

[′an·yə·lər i′klips]
(astronomy)
An eclipse in which a thin ring of the source of light appears around the obscuring body.
References in periodicals archive ?
From their calculations, they determined that the only annular eclipse visible from Canaan between 1500 and 1050 BC was on 30 October 1207 BC, in the afternoon.
An annular eclipse occurs when the moon is farther from the Earth than during total eclipses.
Iceland's next annular eclipse will occur in 2048, while the next total eclipse in the country will be in 2026.
The annular eclipse was also visible in the Arctic and North Atlantic.
RING OF FIRE: The annular eclipse as seen from Caithness; Picture: BOBBY NELSON
Even if some annular eclipses were observed and recorded, they were not available to, or for some unknown reason were neglected by, Ptolemy.
To safely observe the May 20 annular eclipse, special solar filters can be bought to fit over the equipment or No.
On February 12, 1831, an annular eclipse crossed the southeastern United States and was depicted on a map published in that year's American Almanac.
I observed the May 10, 1994, annular eclipse from the top of Monks Mound at prehistoric Cahokia in southwestern Illinois and sensed a reduction in the general light level when the eclipse was central, but it was not profound.
The path of this annular eclipse crosses Sumatra, then Malaysia between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, and continues on between Celebes and Mindanao, north of New Guinea, to end in the southern Pacific Ocean.
None of the spectacular phenomena of a total eclipse will appear; an annular eclipse is really just a special case of a partial one.
Based on new calculations and accounting for the variations in Earth's rotation over time, the researchers concluded: "The only annular eclipse visible from Canaan between 1500 and 1050 BC was on 30 October 1207 BC, in the afternoon.