annular eclipse

(redirected from annular eclipses)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to annular eclipses: Total solar eclipse

annular eclipse

an eclipse of the sun in which the moon does not cover the entire disc of the sun, so that a ring of sunlight surrounds the shadow of the moon
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

annular eclipse

See eclipse.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

annular eclipse

[′an·yə·lər i′klips]
(astronomy)
An eclipse in which a thin ring of the source of light appears around the obscuring body.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The annular eclipse was also visible in the Arctic and North Atlantic.
An annular eclipse was visible in Iceland and Greenland on Saturday morning (31 May), while a partial eclipse was seen in other countries including Norway and Scotland.
In the Kenyan capital of Nairobi many residents gathered to watch this rare celestial phenomenon known as an annular eclipse - because it does not completely black out the sun.
The central line of this annular eclipse runs mostly over water.
The path of this annular eclipse crosses Sumatra, then Malaysia between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore, and continues on between Celebes and Mindanao, north of New Guinea, to end in the southern Pacific Ocean.
I observed the May 10, 1994, annular eclipse from the top of Monks Mound at prehistoric Cahokia in southwestern Illinois and sensed a reduction in the general light level when the eclipse was central, but it was not profound.
In the case of the April 2005 eclipse, its central path begins at sunrise as a short, 28-second annular eclipse about 500 kilometers southeast of New Zealand (at 18:54 Universal Time).
Like other types of solar eclipses, annular eclipses are spectacular but a potentially hazardous sky watching events.
M., 'Annular eclipses and considerations about solar and lunar angular diameters in Medieval astronomy', in Orchiston W., Green D.
Thus the ring of the Sun will be thick and bright, as annular eclipses go.
Sometimes the Moon is too far to completely cover the Sun in the sky, and then viewers see a so-called annular eclipse. In that instance, even though the Moon passes directly across the center of the Sun, a bright "annulus" (ring) remains visible around it.
Based on new calculations and accounting for the variations in Earth's rotation over time, the researchers concluded: "The only annular eclipse visible from Canaan between 1500 and 1050 BC was on 30 October 1207 BC, in the afternoon."