anomalous

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anomalous

[ə′näm·ə·ləs]
(science and technology)
Deviating from the normal; irregular.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The magnetic field showed spots, or regions of anomalously high or low magnetic field.
Looking at the analysis, it becomes apparent that the machine is vibrating anomalously at certain hours of the day.
Scientists have used a new forecast system to predict that the years 2018 to 2022 are going to be an 'anomalously warm' period, with greater chance of extreme temperatures.
Professor Roberto Orosei, from Bologna University, wrote in the journal Science: "Anomalously bright subsurface reflections are evident within a well-defined 12 mile-wide zone which is surrounded by much less reflective areas.
Professor Roberto Orosei, from the University of Bologna, wrote in the journal Science: "Anomalously bright subsurface reflections are evident within a well-defined 20-kilometre-wide zone..
The most anomalously hot weather will rule on the territory of the Republic in July and August.
Aquino and his fellow respondents 'anomalously and illegally funded and procured the Dengvaxia vaccine and used 830,000 schoolchildren as 'guinea pigs' just to bolster the candidacy of Liberal Party presidential bet 'Mar Roxas [II] and of other candidates of the party,' they alleged.
The study also found that the onset of outbreaks might be encouraged by anomalously dry weather conditions, at least in temperate regions.
The anomalously low-friction effect, defined as friction "disappear" effect, is one of the key scientific problems in deep mining, which has attracted more attention of the researchers all over the world [1-8].
This issue, for instance, is full of first-rate writing by critics about their trade and their craft: David Cote with a reported piece about the new opportunities and models for arts criticism springing up, anomalously but hopefully, in the wake of print media's disintegration (p.
1940 painting Horse, which bizarrely depicts its subject rearing on a patterned marble pavement, echoes the de Chirico who claimed to have abjured modernism in favor of a "return of craftsmanship." Yet through the early '40s Graham's efforts remain eclectic, including more quasi-Cubist still lifes and even the anomalously folksy Two Soldiers, 1942.