antecedent


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antecedent

1. Logic the hypothetical clause, usually introduced by "if", in a conditional statement: that which implies the other
2. Maths an obsolescent name for numerator
3. denying the antecedent Logic the fallacy of inferring the falsehood of the consequent of a conditional statement, given the truth of the conditional and the falsehood of its antecedent, as if there are five of them, there are more than four: there are not five, so there are not more than four

antecedent

[′an·tə‚sēd·ənt]
(mathematics)
The numerator of a ratio.
The first of the two statements in an implication.
For an integer, n, that is greater than 1, the preceding integer, n- 1.
References in classic literature ?
I agree," answered Thwackum, with great warmth, "with a man who asserts honour to be antecedent to religion
There are many of them: take as an example the pleasures, of smell, which are very great and have no antecedent pains; they come in a moment, and when they depart leave no pain behind them.
Her benefactors had seen fit to ignore mention of her strange past, and so she passed as their ward whose antecedents not having been mentioned were not to be inquired into.
The first difficulty which we had to contend with was the finding of this American's antecedents.
Nothing peculiar about her family antecedents, is there?
I would much rather not have told her anything of my antecedents, but no man could look into the depth of those eyes and refuse her slightest behest.
Manson Mingott's English son-in-law, the banker, and had speedily made himself an important position in the world of affairs; but his habits were dissipated, his tongue was bitter, his antecedents were mysterious; and when Medora Manson announced her cousin's engagement to him it was felt to be one more act of folly in poor Medora's long record of imprudences.
The product of a large store of reading has been here secreted anew for the reader who desires to see, in bird's-eye view, the light and shade of a long and varied period of poetic literature, by way of preparation for Shakespeare, [9] (with a full essay upon whom the volume closes,) explaining Shakespeare, so far as he can be explained by literary antecedents.
It is worthy of yourselves, worthy of the antecedents of the Gun Club; and it cannot fail to make some noise in the world.
At heart no one is prouder of their family and antecedents.
He told with perfect truth how it had come of a little contraband trading, and how he had in time been released from prison, and how he had gone away from those antecedents.
It is pleasant to know that a new ministry just come into office are not the only fellow-men who enjoy a period of high appreciation and full-blown eulogy; in many respectable families throughout this realm, relatives becoming creditable meet with a similar cordiality of recognition, which in its fine freedom from the coercion of any antecedents, suggests the hopeful possibility that we may some day without any notice find ourselves in full millennium, with cockatrices who have ceased to bite, and wolves that no longer show their teeth with any but the blandest intentions.