antheraxanthin

antheraxanthin

[¦an·thər‚aks¦an·thən]
(biochemistry)
A neutral yellow plant pigment unique to the Euglenophyta.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Wondracek and colleagues [18] detected carotenoids compounds such as neoxanthin, trans-violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, lutein, zeaxanthin, and trans-[beta]-carotene in the P.
Merely three cetrarioid lichens have been investigated for their carotenoid composition: [beta]-carotene 32, zeaxanthin 34, lutein 35, mutatoxanthin 39, [beta]-cryptoxanthin 41, lutein epoxide 42, antheraxanthin 43 and 3'-epilutein 44 in Cetrariella delisei; [alpha]-carotene 31, [beta]-carotene 32, [epsilon]-carotene 33, zeaxanthin 34, lutein 35, violaxanthin 36, lutein epoxide 42 and antheraxanthin 43 in Flavocetraria nivalis, and [beta]-carotene 32, zeaxanthin 34, lutein 35, astaxanthin 37, canthaxanthin 38, luteoxanthin 40, [beta]-cryptoxanthin 41 and lutein epoxide 42 in Cetraria islandica.
Sl/No Compounds Examples Sources [beta]-carotene Fucoxanthin Chondrus crispu s Antheraxanthin, Mastocarpus stellatus 1 Carotenoids Lutein, Brown algae Violaxanthin, Red algae Xanthophylls Zeaxanthin Catechin, Epicatechin Gallate Taonia atomaria Fl avonoid s Cystoseira species 2 Phenols Ph lorotannins Palmaria palmata Stypodiol Sargassum pallidum Isoepitaondiol Fucus vesicu losus Taond iol Terpe noids 3 Pigments Phycoerythrin Red algae Phycocyanin Chondrus crispu s 4 Vitamins Ascorbate Mastocarpus stellatus Vitamin A Sargassumsp.
The conversion of violaxanthin to antheraxanthin and then to zeaxanthin happens under high light conditions.
Several carotenoids are involved, including neoxanthin, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.
The primary carotenoids found in leaf tissue of most plant species include zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, [beta]-carotene, and neoxanthin [1].
In intense light situations, violaxanthin is rapidly and reversibly converted to zeaxanthin, via antheraxanthin. Zeaxanthin is a direct quencher of chlorophyll excited states and can prevent photooxidative stress and lipid peroxidation [7].
(7) The photoquenching abilities of violaxanthin, zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin make them strong candidates for additives to pho-toprotective topical applications.
In this cycle, two carotenoids, zeaxanthin and antheraxanthin, are epoxidized to a third, violaxanthin, and in so doing light energy absorbed in excess is harmlessly dissipated (Demmig-Adams & Adams, 1992).
Another indicator may be the conversion of violaxanthin to zeaxanthin through antheraxanthin. This conversion is believed to be a quenching mechanism for excess excitation energy common during high light conditions (Demmig-Adams, 1990).
Both species had a similar total xanthophyll cycle pool size (V+A+Z, violaxanthin + antheraxanthin + zeaxanthin), which generally increased with time in the high-light treatment [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED].
Several carotenoids were involved, including neoxanthin, antheraxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein and zeaxanthin.