anthracene


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anthracene

(ăn`thrəsēn), C14H10, solid organic compound derived from coal tar. It melts at 218°C; and boils at 354°C;. When pure it is colorless and has a violet fluorescence; it darkens when exposed to sunlight. Anthracene is insoluble in water but is quite soluble in carbon disulfide and somewhat soluble in ethanol, methanol, benzene, chloroform, and other organic solvents. It is readily oxidized to form anthraquinone, the parent compound of the alizarinalizarin
, or 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone, mordant vegetable dye obtained originally from the root of the madder plant (Rubia tinctorum), in which it occurs as a glucoside. The term also includes a group of synthetic dyestuffs prepared from coal-tar derivatives.
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 series of dyes. The molecular structure of anthracene consists of three benzenelike rings joined side by side; it is thus an aromatic compoundaromatic compound,
any of a large class of compounds that includes benzene and compounds that resemble benzene in certain of their chemical properties. Originally applied to a small class of pleasant-smelling chemicals derived from vegetables, it now encompasses a wide diversity
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. It is the first member of the anthracene series, a group of aromatic hydrocarbons that are structurally related to it and have the general formula CnH2n−18.
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anthracene

[′an·thrə‚sēn]
(organic chemistry)
C14H10 A crystalline tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, colorless when pure, melting at 218°C and boiling at 342°C; obtained in the distillation of coal tar; used as an important source of dyestuffs, and in coating applications.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Class Result Alkaloids - Anthocyanins - Anthraquinones - Flavonoids ++ Coumarins - Anthracene derivatives + Lignans - Saponins - Condensed tannins - Hydrolyzable tannins - Triterpenes and steroids - Mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes + (-) negative; (+) weakly positive; (++) moderately positive.
On the other hand, naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, anthracene, pyrene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene were not detected during both rest and work periods.
A certified PAH reference material, containing the 7 EPA priority PAHs including; Naphthalene (Np), Anthracene (An), Chrysene (Chry) and Acenaphthylene (Ace) fluorine (F), Benzo ([alpha]) Pyrene, (B[[alpha]] Py Fluoranthene (Fi) with 97 to 100 % purity was obtained from Accustandard (New Haven, USA).
It was found that the total mean concentration of PAHs was 746.600 ng/[m.sup.3] and dibenzo(a,h) anthracene was in maximum concentration of 142.350 ng/[m.sup.3] among all PAHs under investigation (Kalim et al., 2016).
urens are composed of chemical components belonging to the secondary metabolite classes, which include the anthraquinones, coumarins, anthracene derivatives, mono-, sesqui-, di- and triterpenes, steroids and water-soluble tannins.
The [alpha]-aminophosphonates A-3 and A-4 [25] and the polyphosphoesters P-8-P-11 [20] have been synthesized from the anthracene-derived Schiff base S-1, while the compounds A-5 [25] and A-6 [28] have been prepared using the anthracene and furan-containing Schiff base S-2.
Four were cinnamic acids and derivatives (peaks 2, 3, 9, and 25), four chromones (peaks 1, 13, 15, and 21), nine anthracene compounds and derivatives (peaks 4, 7, 10, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19 and 22), seven flavonoids (peaks 5, 6, 8, 11, 12, 20, and 23) and an oxylipin (peak 24).
Among various fluorophores used for designing of chemosensors, anthracene based compounds have been used for the detection of several analytes, due to their high chemical stability, richness of [pi]-electrons and strong fluorescence [18, 19].
Seven major PAH contaminants of concern (COCs) in sediment were identified in the original site risk assessment based on calculated cancer risk and hazard indexes, which were benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), benzo[b] fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenz[a,h] anthracene, and indeno[1,2,3-c,d]pyrene.
Molecular materials with the anthracene structure have good stability and special luminescent properties, showing a bright blue electroluminescence [27-29].
14 homologues of benzene, 7 homologues of fluorine, 17 homologues of naphthalene, 7 homologues of anthracene, 6 homologues of phenanthrene, and 30 condensed arenes with carbon atoms number greater than 4 were found in the RPNC.