anthracene


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anthracene

(ăn`thrəsēn), C14H10, solid organic compound derived from coal tar. It melts at 218°C; and boils at 354°C;. When pure it is colorless and has a violet fluorescence; it darkens when exposed to sunlight. Anthracene is insoluble in water but is quite soluble in carbon disulfide and somewhat soluble in ethanol, methanol, benzene, chloroform, and other organic solvents. It is readily oxidized to form anthraquinone, the parent compound of the alizarinalizarin
, or 1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone, mordant vegetable dye obtained originally from the root of the madder plant (Rubia tinctorum), in which it occurs as a glucoside. The term also includes a group of synthetic dyestuffs prepared from coal-tar derivatives.
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 series of dyes. The molecular structure of anthracene consists of three benzenelike rings joined side by side; it is thus an aromatic compoundaromatic compound,
any of a large class of compounds that includes benzene and compounds that resemble benzene in certain of their chemical properties. Originally applied to a small class of pleasant-smelling chemicals derived from vegetables, it now encompasses a wide diversity
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. It is the first member of the anthracene series, a group of aromatic hydrocarbons that are structurally related to it and have the general formula CnH2n−18.

anthracene

[′an·thrə‚sēn]
(organic chemistry)
C14H10 A crystalline tricyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, colorless when pure, melting at 218°C and boiling at 342°C; obtained in the distillation of coal tar; used as an important source of dyestuffs, and in coating applications.
References in periodicals archive ?
Di-AC is a known mechanophore, with its cyclooctane-type dimer reverting back to the fluorescent anthracene form under an applied force [50, 63].
Kumar R (2010) Plasmid associated anthracene degradation by Pseudomonas sp isolated from filling station site.
The raw material used is mostly the derivatives of aromatic compounds, such as benzene, naphthalene and anthracene based derivatives.
Numerous PAHs, including benz[a]anthracene, benzo[a] pyrene, benzo[b] fluoranthene, benzo [j] fluoranthene, benzo[k] fluoranthene, chrysene, dibenz [a,h] anthracene, and indeno [1,2,3-c,d] pyrene, were responsible for tumors in laboratory animals when they breathed these substances in the air (David, 1990).
Dichloromethane extracts of all afore mentioned carbonaceous raw materials contained traces of cyclic hydrocarbons, benzene and its derivatives, naphthalene and its methyl-, dimethyl- and trimethyl derivatives, phenanthrene, anthracene and their derivatives, and long chain aliphatic unbranched and branched hydrocarbons.
These compounds are suitable as they contain the anthracene moiety, which is prone to oxidation by singlet oxygen via a selective [4p+2p] addition of this species to the central ring of the anthracene.
The hydrocarbon substances used in this study were xylene, phenanthrene, naphthalene, biphenyl and anthracene and the organic solvents in which hydrocarbons dissolved were ether [15, 16], hexane [17].
Table 1: Toxicity Equivalency Factor (TEF) of the PAHs Compounds PAHs Compounds Toxicity Equivalency Factor (TEF) Dibenzo (a,h) Anthracene 1 Benzo (a) Pyrene 1 Benzo (a) Anthracene 0.
Cyclobutane is condensed to aromatic rings such as benzene, naphthalene, anthracene, and pyrene and may have different substituents such as alkyl, alkoxy, alkylthio, and aryl groups.
anthracene, fluorene, pyrene, chrysene, and phenanthrene) were approximately 2 times greater in CEWAFs than WAFs.