anthropic


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Related to anthropic: Anthropic principle

anthropic

[an′thräp·ik]
(anthropology)
Pertaining to humans or the period of their existence on earth.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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In our view, modern science does offer some clues to the teleological aspects of our universe, as recent debates on anthropic principle suggest.
The anthropic principles describe a universe whose origins and purpose are still veiled in mystery, but one that seems to favor life, beauty and contemplation.
He explains, in a March 1998 interview with Insight, that "the anthropic principle is a major turning point in Western intellectual history - a major, major turning point - because it really marks the end of the modern period when mechanism was triumphant, when the view of the universe as matter and motion was triumphant.
Tipler, The Anthropic Cosmological Principle (Oxford University Press, 1986).
In the 1940's, the prominent cosmologist Abraham Zelmanov introduced his Anthropic Principle:
The crucial difference between the living being and other regions of the for-itself is that the living being operates within functional closure--the defunctionalization of the human psyche ruptures the stratum of the living being at the anthropic moment.
The anthropic principle allows for consideration of scientific explanations of creation, such as the big-bang theory, which asserts that the universe expanded to its current state through an explosion that shattered an infinite density of matter and space.
In order to avoid questions about how these properties became so finely tuned, the anthropic principle is combined with the idea that our universe is part of a multiverse, in which each universe has randomly determined properties.
Food for Thought "As the anthropic principle has been discussed and debated by cosmologists in the last decade, it has taken on three forms, called 'weak,' 'strong,' and 'participatory.' The original, weak anthropic principle says merely that the conditions we observe will be those that allow us to exist....
Most well versed physicists will probably base their own opinions about the Anthropic Principle at any particular time on whatever the latest scientific thinking happens to be at that moment.
The fact that the greatest abundance of specimens occurred in anthropic environments is a matter of concern because it is likely abundance will increase even more as more of the forested land becomes anthropized.
Regarding the multiverse solution to the anthropic problem presented in his new popular book, the reader should be aware that string theory is not an experimentally confirmed part of physics, neither is the connection with inflation that says different string vacua will be realised in different expanding universe domains.