anthropic principle


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anthropic principle

(an-throp -ik) A principle that was put forward in the 1960s by R. Dicke and maintains that the presence of life in the Universe places constraints on the ways in which the very early Universe evolved: the possible initial conditions are limited to those that give rise to an inhabited Universe, i.e. what we observe must be restricted by the conditions necessary for our presence as observers.

anthropic principle

[an′thräp·ik ′prin·sə·pəl]
(astronomy)
The assertion that the presence of intelligent life on earth places limits on the many ways the universe could have developed and could have caused the conditions of temperature that prevail today.
References in periodicals archive ?
An anthropic principle prediction capable of accounting for such a coincidence would thus lend confirmation to the principle.
Zelmanov's Anthropic Principle and the Infinite Relativity Principle.
If you are already disposed to be hopeful, as Christian theologians should be, then you should not be surprised that the universe was seeded in its opening moments with enormous potential for blossoming over the course of time into an astounding array of incalculable outcomes--one of these being consciousness--which is what the Anthropic Principle focuses on.
For a magisterial refutation of the Anthropic Principle, see Steven Weinberg, "A Designer Universe?
Some kind of anthropic principle will always be invokable to explain the origin of life, of multicellularity and all the other major transitions as it is for apparent coincidences like the value of the fine structure constant.
So I gave my talk, and in the middle of the talk I said, 'Okay, now I will start talking about the anthropic principle.
Glynn's own conclusion after his thorough study of both afterlife and the anthropic principle is that "if the anthropic principle represented a rediscovery of order -- and seemingly design -- in the universe, then near-death research offered the first systematic body of evidence suggestive of the existence of a soul.
The question bears on the issue of extraterrestrial beings, UFOs, and the anthropic principle.
Zelmanov's Anthropic Principle, although introduced in the 1940's, has been published only recently: "The Universe has the interior we observe because we observe the Universe in this way.
Well, of course no living being could ever find itself stuck within a dead universe, and that simple realization is in fact the cornerstone of the anthropic principle.
That's why I'm not interested in the Templeton Foundation--finding God in the anthropic principle or finding God here or there.
If one is in need of a not-too-technical rundown of modern physics and cosmology--and the metaphysical and theological problems that seemingly arise--one has it here in abundance: the Big Bang, the design argument from initial conditions, indeterminism, chaos theory, the anthropic principle, the future of the physical universe.